Addendum to 2018-2019 Catalog

Addendum Publication Date: Sept. 19, 2018


The course description and prerequisites for BIO 364 were listed incorrectly in the 2018-2019 Catalog.

Corrected Information for BIO 364


BIO 364      HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I WITH LAB      Credits: 4

A study of the structure and function of some of the organ systems of the human body including the skeletal, muscular, endocrine, and nervous systems.
Prerequisites: BIO 211 and CHM 212 or CHM 102 for Nursing students with a C or better
Corequisites: BIO 364L


The following is updated or additional information regarding the policies and practices of Concordia University's School of Law.

Additional Law School Policy Information


Transferring Credits

Credits from ABA-Approved Juris Doctor Programs

Students who successfully complete 30 credits and are in Good Academic Standing may receive credit for courses taken at other ABA-approved law schools, subject to the approval of the Associate Dean of Academics prior to the start of any coursework for which transfer credit is desired. Scholarships and merit awards issued by Concordia may not be used towards these credits. The pre-approval form is available at law.cu-portland.edu/student-services/student-policies-and-forms.

Students of the School of Law who attend ABA-approved foreign or domestic law schools/programs must obtain the Concordia Law equivalent of a 2.0 ("C") grade or better for transfer of credit to be granted. Transfer of credit does not apply to courses taken on a pass/fail basis or other ungraded legal experiences.

Course grades received from other law schools and/or legal programs are not included in Concordia Law School's GPA computation.

Credit for Non-Law Graduate-Level Courses

Students who successfully complete 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.8 at the time of the pre-approval request may receive up to six (6) credits for non-law graduate-level courses. The non-law courses must (1) be related to the student's course of law study, (2) not duplicate courses offered by Concordia's School of Law, (3) not duplicate other undergraduate or graduate coursework the student has completed, and (4) not exceed the permissible Course Load and Overload levels for a given semester. The student must obtain prior written permission, at least thirty (30) days before the start of the non-law course, from the Associate Dean of Academics. Scholarships and merit awards issued by Concordia may not be used towards these courses. The pre-approval form is available at law.cu-portland.edu/student-services/student-policies-and-forms. Credit for such approved graduate-level courses will be granted only if the student receives the equivalent of a 3.0 ("B") grade or higher, and the course will be recorded on the law transcript with a grade of P.

+++++  (The following section is in the current catalog at catalog.cu-portland.edu/graduate/law-graduate-degree/juris-doctor/) under the title Application Requirements for Transfer Students.)

Incoming Transfer Students

Transfer students are admitted by the Admissions Committee. The Associate Dean of Academics will determine the number of credits accepted and the curriculum required for an admitted transfer student to graduate from the School of Law in accordance with this policy. 

Concordia Law allows a maximum of 39 credits to transfer in from an ABA-approved law school towards a student's program of study. Students who attend ABA-approved foreign or domestic law schools/programs must obtain a 2.0 (“C”) grade or better for transfer of credit to be granted. Transfer of credit does not apply to courses taken on a pass/fail basis or other ungraded legal experiences. The faculty may consider petitions for exceptions from this policy on a case by case basis.

In determining the curriculum needed to graduate, the Associate Dean of Academics shall allow course(s) taken at the transferor school to satisfy Concordia’s J.D. Program requirement(s) on a determination that the content of the course(s) substantially overlaps and that the course(s) credit is eligible and will be transferred.   

Course grades received from other law schools and/or legal programs are not included in Concordia School of Law’s GPA computation.

+++++

Study Abroad

Students who have successfully completed their first year of study with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 may receive credit for legal studies at foreign summer, intersession, or semester programs offered by ABA-approved law schools, subject to approval of the Associate Dean of Academics prior to the start of such studies. Scholarships and merit awards issued by Concordia may not be used towards these programs. The pre-approval process for Credits from ABA-Approved Juris Doctor Programs listed above is used to request and receive approval for study abroad courses to transfer back to Concordia Law.


Procedures for Students Subject to Academic Dismissal

...
The faculty-designated committee will endeavor to make a decision on the petition within five business days of its receipt. In deciding the petition, the faculty-designated committee may consider information from faculty members and staff. The faculty-designated committee may deny the petition, may allow the student to continue immediately, may allow the student to continue after a set period of time, or may defer deciding the petition until it receives further information.
...

Words in bold above are being added to original wording found at current-catalog.cu-portland.edu/graduate/law-graduate-degree/juris-doctor/


Grading Scale

Numerical Grades

Grades are awarded numerically, to the hundredths, on a range from 4.33 to .00. All grades between .99 and .01 will be recorded as .00. This chart provides an approximate letter grade conversion:

Grade Quality Points/Semester Points
A+ 4.33
A 4.00
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.00
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.00
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.00
F .00

Pass/No Pass Grades

A Pass/No Pass grading system is utilized in specific courses, as designated by the faculty. These courses include inter alia, mentorship, externship field hours, and competition terms. Pass No/Pass courses have no impact on Grade Point Average calculations.


Degree Requirements

A student’s graduation degree requirements are established based on matriculation date. To qualify for the degree of Juris Doctor, a student must:

  1. Complete a course of study of not fewer than 90 credit hours of course work.
  2. Achieve a final cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.
  3. Achieve a passing grade in all required courses.
  4. Complete all of the graduation degree requirements no earlier than 24 months and no later than 84 months after a student has commenced studies at the School of Law or a law school from which transfer credit has been accepted.
  5. Complete all required courses:
    1. Business Organizations
    2. Civil Procedure I
    3. Civil Procedure II
    4. Constitutional Law I
    5. Constitutional Law II
    6. Contracts I
    7. Contracts II
    8. Criminal Law
    9. Criminal Procedure
    10. Evidence
    11. Foundations of Justice
    12. Legal Research & Writing I
    13. Legal Research & Writing II
    14. Professional Responsibility    
    15. Property I
    16. Property II
    17. Success Skills
    18. Torts I
    19. Torts II
  6. Complete two (2) Menu Courses from this list:
  • Administrative Law
  • Bankruptcy
  • Conflict of Laws
  • Federal Courts
  • Federal Income Tax
  • Secured Transactions
  • Wills, Trusts & Estates
  1. Complete all requirements associated with:
    1. the Legacy Mentor Program,
    2. the Pro Bono Service Requirement,
    3. the Advanced Writing Requirement, and
    4. the Experiential Course Requirement.

The following are updated course numbers, titles, and descriptions:

Corrected Law Course Information


LAW 601       CIVIL PROCEDURE I       Credits: 3
Civil Procedure I examines the civil litigation process of the federal courts, from the inception of the case by filing a complaint, to discovery of factual information, through trials and other resolutions, and finally to appeals of adverse judgments. The course also explores under what conditions parties may litigate a previously decided case or issue a second time in a new lawsuit.

LAW 602       CIVIL PROCEDURE II       Credits: 3
Civil Procedure II offers students an introduction to the fundamentals of the civil litigation in the Federal Courts of the United States. The course covers the following legal doctrines and rules:  subject-matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, notice and opportunity to be heard, venue, forum non conveniens, and the Erie doctrine.

LAW 603       WRITING FOR THE BAR EXAM       Credits: 1
This course teaches the writing, analysis, and time-management skills needed for success on the essay portions of the Uniform Bar Exam—the Multistate Performance Test and the Multistate Essay Examination. This course supplements, but does not replace, a traditional commercial bar review course.

LAW 604       MOOT COURT COMPETITION       Credits: 1
Upon successful completion as a top finisher in the Moot Court course, students will prepare for and compete as members of a team in the American Bar Association Law Student Division's National Appellate Advocacy Competition by submitting a brief and participating in oral argument based on a hypothetical appeal to the United States Supreme Court.
Prerequisites: LAW 671 with a P grade

LAW 605       CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I       Credits: 3
This course examines the rules governing the grants of power under Articles I, II and III, the limits on state power under Article IV, and limits on federal power expressed in the Ninth and Tenth Amendments.

LAW 606       CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II       Credits: 3
This course focuses on the individual rights guaranteed by the First Amendment and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.  The course will cover equal protection, substantive due process, the religion clauses, and free speech clause.
Prerequisites: LAW 605 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 607       INTENSIVE LEGAL ANALYSIS       Credits: 3
Intensive Legal Analysis is designed to help students develop and refine the analysis and problem-solving skills that are required for optimal success in law school, the bar exam, and in the practice of law. 
Prerequisites: LAW 623 with a 1.00 or higher or concurrent enrollment

LAW 608       PROPERTY I       Credits: 3
This course covers the legal concept of real property. It includes a study of adverse possession, estates and future interests, the Rule Against Perpetuities, rights and obligations inherent in concurrent ownership of real property, and eminent domain and regulatory taking jurisprudence.

LAW 609       CONTRACTS I       Credits: 3
This course covers the principles that govern the formation and performance of legally enforceable promises. The focus for the first part of the two-semester course is on contract formation, including offer and acceptance; the concept of consideration, substitutes to consideration for enforcement of promises; the issues and challenges that arise during the period of contract negotiation; standard form contracts; and the statute of frauds.

LAW 610       CONTRACTS II       Credits: 3
This course covers the interpretation and enforcement of contracts.
Prerequisites: LAW 609 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 611       PRACTICUM: CONTRACTS       Credits: 2
This course introduces students to the techniques of negotiating and drafting business contracts with an emphasis on understanding the nexus between the deal and the contract. Students will gain hand-on experience advising clients in simulated situations, including understanding contractual concepts contained in most business contracts; translating the deal accurately; recognizing, negotiating and drafting nuances in language that change the deal; and delivering meaningful and ethical client service by adding value to the contract and deal.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 613       CRIMINAL LAW       Credits: 3
This course examines theories of criminal liability, essential elements of criminal responsibility, classifications of crimes, elements of crime at common law and by statute, defenses to criminal responsibility, and theories of punishment and consequence.

LAW 614       CRIMINAL PROCEDURE       Credits: 3
This course examines constitutional restraints on police practices, interactions during police stops, searches and seizures, arrests and interrogation, and rights conferred through the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments.

LAW 615       PRACTICUM: CRIMINAL LAW       Credits: 2
As roughly 95 percent of all criminal cases are resolved without going to trial, this course provides students hands-on experience in the pretrial phase of criminal prosecution and defense along with plea negotiation and sentencing. Students will develop skills, particularly those most difficult to obtain, like case assessment and strategy, charging decisions and prosecutorial discretion, identifying and addressing legal and ethical concerns, interviewing witnesses and clients, negotiating pleas, and arguing sentences.
Prerequisites: LAW 613 and LAW 614 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 616       CRIMINAL ADJUDICATION       Credits: 3
This course examines the adjudication phase of the criminal process, focusing primarily on the constitutional doctrines regulating the adjudicative process. The course will cover topics such as prosecutorial discretion, selective prosecution, grand juries, right to counsel, discovery, plea bargaining, jury rights, double jeopardy, and appeals.
Prerequisites: LAW 613 and LAW 614 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 617       EVIDENCE       Credits: 3
This course is structured to provide a theoretical and practical understanding of the law of evidence. It covers the rules and limitations in the Federal Rules of Evidence as well as testimonial immunities and privileges that determine what information can be presented in a legal proceeding.

LAW 618       FOUNDATIONS OF JUSTICE       Credits: 3
This course explores topics of human dignity, the social order, the role of the state, economic justice, and the place of morality in a pluralist society. The role of morality in these settings and in the life of a lawyer is seen through the lens of religious and secular readings, as well as through judicial opinions that implicate these topics. Emphasis on student presentation of opposing viewpoints in a cogent and respectful manner.
Prerequisites: LAW 606 and LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 619       PROPERTY       Credits: 4
This course examines the legal concept of real property, which emerges as a set of discrete rights in land enforceable as against others. The course also examines adverse possession, estates and future interests, the Rule Against Perpetuities, rights and obligations inherent in concurrent ownership of real property, landlord-tenant law, express and implied easements, nuisance law, land-use regulation, zoning law, eminent domain and regulatory taking jurisprudence.

LAW 620       PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY       Credits: 3
Professional Responsibility is designed to develop students' substantive knowledge about attorney ethics and regulation and to prepare them to identify and respond to these issues in practice. The course covers in detail the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and other sources of law that regulate attorneys.

LAW 621       FEDERAL COURTS       Credits: 3
This course covers the sharing of power between the federal courts and the political branches of the federal government and the allocation of power between the federal and state judicial systems.
Prerequisites: LAW 601 and LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 622       PRACTICUM: LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT       Credits: 2
This course provides a general introduction to law office management with an emphasis on solo and small firm practice.  Students will explore issues relating to operations and facilities management, risk management, strategic planning, marketing, human resources, information and technology management, accounting, finance, and compensation, as well as case management, client management, practice management systems, legal ethics, and professionalism.

LAW 623       LEGAL RESEARCH & WRITING I       Credits: 3
Integrated instruction in the fundamentals of legal research, analysis, and writing of objective legal memoranda includes fact investigation, research strategies, problem solving, the relationship between research and analysis, effective strategies for written communication, principles of organization, clarity, and conciseness in legal writing, and understanding audience.

LAW 624       CIVIL RIGHTS       Credits: 3
This course will explore the substantive, ethical and strategic issues involved in litigating civil rights actions. This course will allow students to both learn basic principles of governmental liability/defenses and apply their knowledge of torts, constitutional law and civil procedure in a litigation setting.
Prerequisites: LAW 605 with a 1.00 or higher and LAW 606 with a 1.00 or higher or concurrent enrollment

LAW 625       LEGAL RESEARCH & WRITING II       Credits: 3
Building on the research, writing, and analytical skills of Legal Research & Writing I, students focus on persuasive writing as they produce trial or appellate briefs. Students present oral arguments in a courtroom setting. Includes research, citation, and writing workshops, and additional client communications and professionalism components. Offered in small sections to allow individual conferences with faculty members on writing assignments.
Prerequisites: LAW 623 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 626       TORTS I       Credits: 3
This course will provide an overview of intentional torts and defenses to them: negligence, including damages, proximate cause, and contributory and comparative negligence; and defenses to claims of negligence.

LAW 627       FOUNDATIONS OF LEGAL ANALYSIS       Credits: 3
This course develops fundamental lawyering skills: sorting detailed factual materials; analyzing statutory, case, and administrative materials; applying law to facts; identifying and resolving ethical dilemmas; communicating effectively in writing; and timely completing lawyering tasks. This course is designed to ensure that the student is practice-ready after graduation and will also aid in preparing the student for the Multi-State Performance Test portion of the bar exam.

LAW 628       EXTERNSHIP       Credits: 2-6
The externship program combines field work in a diversity of practice settings with a contemporaneous class, regularly scheduled tutorial, or other guided reflection designed to reinforce lawyering skills and the social and ethical responsibilities of the profession. Placements must be supervised by a lawyer and the work must be substantive legal work.

LAW 630       ADMINISTRATIVE LAW       Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn how administrative agencies function, including the procedural rules governing them, how courts interpret statutes creating them and review administrative decisions, how agencies provide expertise or the ability to act when conflict prevents legislative action, and limitations on the delegation of powers to administrative agencies.

LAW 631       ALW: LITIGATION PLANNING & DRAFTING       Credits: 3
This course covers both strategy and drafting through simulated litigation scenarios. It covers initial case evaluation, ethics in practice, drafting pleadings and discovery requests, affidavits, motions, proposed orders, trial briefs, and other documents lawyers produce. It provides students with an opportunity to both deepen and expand on the skills learned in LRW I and II, to evaluate and support a client's claim, and to sharpen the skills necessary to become a successful litigator.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 632       ALW: JUDICIAL WRITING       Credits: 2
This course focuses on the writing tasks done within the chambers of an appellate judge as well as ethics in practice. Students will step into the role of a judicial clerk in a mock setting, analyzing a record and briefing, researching the issues presented to the court, and producing a bench memorandum. After examining how judges decide cases and what attributes make exemplary opinions, students will transform the bench memorandum into a final opinion.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 633       CONFLICT OF LAWS       Credits: 3
Conflict of Laws examines problems that arise when disputes implicate the laws of multiple jurisdictions. When a case has a connection to more than one state (or more than one country), or involves the intersection of both state and federal interests, how should a court decide which law to apply and what tribunals can hear a case?
Prerequisites: LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 634       PRACTICUM: ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION       Credits: 2
This course examines the variety of processes and techniques designed to help disagreeing parties come to an agreement short of litigation. The most commonly used alternative dispute resolution (ADR) systems are negotiation, mediation, collaborative law, and arbitration. Students will explore the role lawyers often play in ADR processes, either by advising clients on and representing them in proceedings, or by serving as adjudicators, arbitrators, conciliators, and/or mediators.
Prerequisites: LAW 601 and LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 635       BANKRUPTCY       Credits: 3
This course will examine federal bankruptcy as it relates to individuals and businesses. Topics included are bankruptcy court structure, eligibility for Chapter 7, Chapter 11, and Chapter 13, property of the bankruptcy estate, the automatic stay, exempt property, non-dischargeable debts, requirements of the Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 plans, treatment of executory contracts and leases, and the avoiding powers of the trustee.
Prerequisites: LAW 636 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 636       BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS       Credits: 4
This course examines the laws governing modern business entities, including agency, partnership, and limited liability companies. The course also examines legal issues relevant to the control and management of a corporation, with a focus on public corporations. This course serves as a gateway to further study of transactional and business law through other elective courses.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 637       PRACTICUM: BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS       Credits: 2
This course addresses the various legal, ethical, and practical issues that arise when representing businesses as clients through the vehicle of a hypothetical start-up entity(ies). Students will gain hands-on experience advising and representing clients in simulated business situations, including engaging in client consultation, interviewing, and counseling; drafting client advice documents; evaluating corporate structures; incorporating an entity; and financing a start-up business. 
Prerequisites: LAW 636 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 638       MOCK TRIAL       Credits: 2
The workshop course provides students an opportunity to implement classroom theory through simulating the trial process. Students will participate in teams and will develop a litigation strategy based on a real-life problem and then present their case before a panel of lawyers and judges. The competition allows students to develop and hone courtroom skills, such as opening and closing argument, witness preparation, direct examination, cross examination, objections to evidence, demonstrative evidence and ethics in practice.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, LAW 613, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 640       EMPLOYMENT LAW       Credits: 3
This course will help students understand the basic framework of U.S. employment law. It will cover topics such as race, sex, religion, disability, and age discrimination, wage and hour laws and laws covering employee privacy, workers compensation, unemployment insurance, immigration, and safety and health.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 641       ENVIRONMENTAL LAW       Credits: 3
Students will gain an introduction to environmental law. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 642       FAMILY LAW       Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn the fundamental framework governing marriage, divorce, parenting, child support, property distribution, and spousal maintenance.

LAW 643       AGRICULTURE LAW       Credits: 3
This course provides an overview and introduction to agricultural law. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, U.S. agricultural regulation, U.S. agricultural policy, farm subsidies and assistance programs, livestock production and animal welfare, food safety, and biotechnology. The course may also discuss property law, labor law, immigration law, and environmental law as they relate to agricultural production, distribution, and marketing.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 644       IMMIGRATION LAW       Credits: 3
This course examines the entry, presence, expulsion, and naturalization of noncitizens, and the content and significance of U.S. citizenship and nationality. Specific topics will include Congress’ plenary power over immigration; the interaction between immigration and federalism; the constitutional rights of noncitizens; the criteria for the admission of noncitizens; the grounds for exclusion and deportation; the rules governing adjustment of status; and the law governing, refugees and asylees.

LAW 645       EDUCATION LAW       Credits: 3
This course will address the fundamental framework governing education law through exploration of cases, legislation, and regulations. Students will also discuss current issues facing the education system in Idaho and the Northwest.

LAW 646       INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY       Credits: 3
This is a survey course of intellectual property law. The course will provide students with an introduction to principles of intellectual law. The course will cover basic principles of trade secret, patent, copyright, trademark, and publicity rights law along with other topics as time allows.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 647       INTERNATIONAL LAW       Credits: 3
This course will serve as a basic introduction to the rules, procedures, institutions and actors that are involved in the development, enforcement, and adjudication of public international law.

LAW 648       FEDERAL INDIAN LAW       Credits: 3
This course will examine the history and fundamentals of Federal Indian Law in the United States from European contact to the present day. The course will explore the law governing the relationships between the Indian tribes, the federal government, and the states. Topics include the federal-tribal relationship, tribal sovereignty, civil and criminal jurisdiction for both members and non-members of the tribes, protection of religious practices and sacred sites, gaming, Indian land rights and environmental issues.

LAW 649       CORPORATE TAX       Credits: 3
This course examines the taxation of corporations and their shareholders focusing on corporate formation, capital structure, non-liquidating distributions, liquidations, reorganizations, and the treatment of tax attributes. Theories of tax policy are discussed throughout the semester. Practical application of economic theories relevant to transactional law practice are framed throughout the course.
Prerequisites: LAW 636 and LAW 657 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 650       PROPERTY II       Credits: 3
This course includes the study of a real estate transactions; deeds and mortgages; forms of title assurance, title covenants, and title insurance; the recording system and the recording statutes; landlord/tenant law; nuisance law; and the law of fixtures.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 651       MENTORSHIP       Credits: 0.0-0.5
Through the mentorship program, students are paired with lawyers and judges in the community who will expose them to a wide range of lawyering tasks and the ethical responsibilities of the profession.  Second and third year students will participate in an academic credit program that combines field observation and networking with a contemporaneous workshop.

LAW 653       PRACTICUM: LITIGATION TECHNOLOGY       Credits: 2
Through this course, students will receive hands-on training in, and an introduction to, the use of various litigation and trial technology that is currently used in the legal profession. Students will also explore upcoming technologies and their potential impact on the legal profession and market. The class will use a mock trial practice component as a vehicle for learning about and mastering different litigation and trial technology.

LAW 654       BAR EXAM PLANNING       Credits: 1
This course familiarizes students with the components of the bar exam, the application process, and evidence-based learning strategies necessary for effective bar exam preparation. In addition, this course teaches multiple choice strategy, integrating substantive review of at least one topic tested on the multiple-choice component of the exam.
Prerequisites: LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 655       REMEDIES       Credits: 3
The course studies the several remedies within the broader categories of equitable remedies, contempt, damages, declaratory judgments and restitution of specific property. The course covers damages, which includes a review of contract damages, tort damages, tort reform, other limitations and punitive damages. The course also covers restitutionary damages, including unjust enrichment, suit in assumpsit, and constructive trusts.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 610, and LAW 626 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 656       PRACTICUM: TAX RESEARCH AND PLANNING       Credits: 2
This course builds upon the legal research skills obtained during the first-year legal writing and research program by concentrating on tax research and the application of the research to tax problems. Utilizing realistic fact-based scenarios, students will gain knowledge of both primary and secondary sources in print and online used in tax research with the aim to develop students into competent and ethical tax researchers.
Prerequisites: LAW 657 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 657       FEDERAL INCOME TAX       Credits: 3
This course examines Federal Income Taxation of the individual. It includes basic principles of the federal income tax—including concepts of gross income, exclusions, deductions, elements of tax procedure, judicial review, and tax research. Tax concepts and theories of tax policy are discussed throughout the semester. Practical application of economic theories relevant to transactional law practice are framed throughout the course.

LAW 658       TORTS II       Credits: 3
This course covers the rules imposing strict liability on dangerous activities and products and the transitions that created modern strict liability. Students will learn the doctrinal rules and to make arguments about liability based in social justice and policy, enabling them to be better lawyers, lobbyists, judges, or legislators.
Prerequisites: LAW 626 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 659       PRACTICUM: TRIAL PRACTICE AND ADVOCACY       Credits: 2
This course is designed for students who are interested in learning how to select a jury, properly examine witnesses, conduct a trial, and litigate a case. Students will gain hand-on experience in trial strategy, jury selection, direct and cross examination, objections to evidence, demonstrative evidence, pre-trial motions, opening statements, ethics in practice, and final arguments.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 660       SECURED TRANSACTIONS       Credits: 2
This course introduces students to all aspects of security interests in personal property collateral and enforcement of security interests. This course will emphasize the use of problems as a primary means of learning how to use the code and counsel hypothetical creditor or debtor clients in both transactional and litigation situations.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 661       WATER LAW       Credits: 3
Water Law will explore in depth the law governing the allocation and administration of water resources. Although students will gain a general understanding of riparian law as it functions in the Eastern United States, this course will focus primarily on water law as it operates in the Western United States.

LAW 662       WILLS, TRUSTS & ESTATES       Credits: 3
Wills, Trusts and Estates considers basic estate planning tools for individuals and families. This course will examine both the law and the policy animating the law and the ethical issues that lawyers in this field confront daily.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 663       PRACTICUM: ESTATE PLANNING       Credits: 2
Through simulated practice experiences, this course presents problems in estate analysis, planning, and execution. Students will plan an estate from the interview stage, to the drafting of wills and trusts, to the implementation of the estate plan. Students will explore various topics, including minimizing estate and gift taxes, trusts for minors, charitable giving, disposition of a family business, incapacity, step-families and non-traditional families, legal ethics, and valuation.
Prerequisites: LAW 657 and LAW 662 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 664       ALW: INTENSIVE LEGAL WRITING       Credits: 3
This course covers ethics, strategy, and drafting through simulated scenarios.  It may cover drafting office memorandum, legislation, contracts, complaints, affidavits, motions, proposed orders, trial briefs, and other documents lawyers produce. It will provide students with an opportunity to both deepen and expand on the skills learned in LRW I and II, to evaluate and support a client's claim, and to sharpen the skills necessary to become a successful litigator.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 665       ALW: ADVANCED APPELLATE ADVOCACY       Credits: 2
This course provides students with an opportunity to hone their brief writing skills to become more effective and ethical advocates though simulated scenarios. The course provides valuable skills regarding organization of legal arguments and effective presentation. The course is valuable for students who intend on participating in moot court competitions, but it will also provide students with an opportunity to hone their appellate litigation skills, which are necessary to becoming a successful practitioner.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 667       PRACTICUM: EVIDENCE       Credits: 2
This course is a practical skills course of the rules governing the admissibility or exclusion of evidence at trial. Subjects include competency of witnesses, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, the rule against hearsay and its exceptions, expert and lay opinion testimony, privileged communications, relevancy, procedural considerations, burden of proof, presumptions, form and type of objections, authentication, the best evidence rule, legal ethics, and the use of demonstrative and scientific evidence.
Prerequisites: LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher or concurrent enrollment

LAW 668       PRACTICUM: ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH       Credits: 2
This course builds upon the legal research skills obtained during the first-year legal writing and research program to create advanced and ethical researchers.  Utilizing realistic fact-based scenarios, students will have an opportunity to use their more advanced legal analysis skills to complete more complicated and nuanced research tasks that more closely mimic real-world research and analysis undertaken by lawyers.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 669       ALW: RHETORIC       Credits: 3
This course introduces advanced theories and practices of persuasion in legal communication through simulated scenarios. Students survey the leading theories of persuasion, including both classical and contemporary rhetoric; critically analyze briefs and opinions to assess the authors’ use of persuasive methods and strategies as well as the audience’s response; and draft and revise two sections of a persuasive brief. The course develops students’ the ability to make deliberate, effective, and ethical persuasive choices.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 671       MOOT COURT       Credits: 1
In this workshop course, students will grapple with at least one hypothetical appeal to an appellate court, researching complex issues, engaging in critical thinking and problem solving, and developing case strategy. Students will refine their written and oral advocacy skills. Through an internal competition, students compete on their own, not as members of a team. The top finishers are eligible to enroll in the Moot Court Competition course and participate in external moot court competitions.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 672       PRACTICUM: DEPOSITION       Credits: 2
This course introduces students to the important skills of preparing for, conducting, defending, and using depositions in civil litigation. Students will gain hands-on experience ethically conducting and defending depositions on behalf of clients on simulated situations.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 673       NATURAL RESOURCES       Credits: 3
The course covers major federal statutes dealing with natural resources law. Specific topics may include mining law, oil and gas law, water law, public land law, energy law, and the legal treatment of wildlife, biodiversity, fisheries, marine resources, forests, and rangelands. Students will be able to formulate both legal and non-legal strategies for resolving natural resources law issues while gaining an understanding of ethical and economic concerns related to natural resource management and protection.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 674       OIL & GAS LAW       Credits: 3
This course addresses the ownership, development, and conservation of oil and gas. It emphasizes real property and contract law concepts unique to oil and gas law and the relationships among landowners and oil and gas companies involved in exploration and production of oil and gas. It covers oil and gas legal terms, mineral rights, conveyances, oil and gas leases, and title issues, and federal and state administrative regulation.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 and LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 675       REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS       Credits: 3
The course studies the legal issues that arise in real estate transactions. Those legal issues include a study of purchase contracts, closing transactions, and liabilities that follow closure. The course covers the recording system, titles, mortgages, default and foreclosure.
Prerequisites: LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 676       PRACTICUM: REAL ESTATE       Credits: 2
This course introduces modern transactional real estate practice with a focus on commercial real estate transactions. Students will learn to prepare and revise documents used in commercial real estate transactions. Discussions and assignments will be based upon simulated fact patterns and mock negotiations.  Students will identify legal, ethical and business issues that arise in the preparation and revision of documents, and how to structure and negotiate transactions, engage with clients, and resolve disputes.
Prerequisites: LAW 619 or LAW 650 with a 1.00 or highe

LAW 677       INTERNET LAW       Credits: 3
This course examines the major legal issues surrounding the Internet and its role in today's society. Major topics include: the special jurisdictional issues with the Internet; contracts; trespass and the Computer Fraud & Abuse Act (CFAA); intellectual property (copyright, trademark and domain names); pornography; defamation and information torts; privacy; spam; blogs and social networking sites; and other timely Internet issues as the schedule allows.

LAW 678       ALW: LOGIC & NARRATIVE       Credits: 2
Through this course, students will be able to identify and use the basics of logic and its application to legal reasoning. Students will also be able to identify various forms of narrative devises and their application to legal writing as well as apply the techniques learned to their legal writing.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 679       SPORTS LAW       Credits: 3
This course will cover legal issues pertaining to both professional and amateur team sports. Representative issues include: labor issues; antitrust issues, individual player-club contract issues; constitutional issues; gender equity issues; and disability discrimination issues. This course provides an analysis of the sports industries and the laws which regulate or fail to regulate their functions and behavior. The course will also cover health, safety, and risk management issues in these sports.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 680       SECOND AMENDMENT SEMINAR       Credits: 2
This course is an intensive, seminar-driven inquiry into the history, operation and controversy surrounding gun control and Second Amendment law and debate. Through the conception, drafting, execution and presentation of a substantial term paper, students will increase their drafting, research, writing and presentation skills.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 681       LAW REVIEW SCHOLARSHIP       Credits: 1
Through this workshop course, members of the Concordia Law Review will research and write a note or comment suitable for publication under the guidance of faculty members. The course aims to develop an understanding of legal scholarship, as well as impart the significance and societal role of academic legal research.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 682       LAW REVIEW PRODUCTION       Credits: 1
Through this workshop course, members of the Concordia Law Review select, edit and publish high-quality, general legal scholarship by creating one or more law review issues.  The course aims to develop an understanding of the legal publishing process, as well as impart the significance and societal role of academic legal research.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 683       INSURANCE LAW       Credits: 3
This course covers the fundamental framework governing insurance law through exploration of cases, legislation, regulations, and law reform proposals.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 684       ALW: LEGISLATIVE DRAFTING       Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the forms and conventions of legislative drafting to conceptualize legislative solutions to real-world problems through simulated scenarios. The course refines student’s ability to analyze statutes, introduces theories of statutory interpretation and canons of construction, and deepens research skills. It also builds on skills learned in LRW I and II to develop the reasoning, writing, research, and other communication skills crucial to becoming successful lawyers.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 685       COMPLEX LITIGATION       Credits: 2
This course helps students learn how to advocate for their clients in complex litigation, including selecting appropriate forums and way for resolving disputes, advocating for and against class action certification, using expert witnesses, e-discovery, and arranging for settlement and fees.
Prerequisites: LAW 602 and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 686       LEADERSHIP FOR LAWYERS       Credits: 2
This workshop course focuses on leadership, ethics, project design, implementation and management.  In line with Concordia's mission to promote servant leadership, students will develop leadership skills through the development of a plan for a legal pro bono project, either individually or working on a team.
Prerequisites: LAW 620 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 687       HEALTH LAW       Credits: 3
This course examines the regulation, structure, and financing of the American health care system, including public and private insurance, access to low income and uninsured, and fraud and abuse laws.

LAW 688       WORKERS' COMPENSATION LAW       Credits: 3
This course will provide the law student with a broad understanding of the workers' compensation system in use today established to compensate and treat injured workers involved in work accidents

LAW 689       SUCCESS SKILLS       Credits: 1
This course familiarizes students with the process of legal education and introduces the foundational skills required for optimal law school performance.  The course covers evidence-based learning strategies, reading and briefing cases, notetaking, synthesizing rules, creating course outlines, and drafting legal analysis in the context of the law school exam.
Corequisites: LAW 601 or LAW 609 or LAW 613 or LAW 626 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 690       CLINIC: CRIMINAL LAW       Credits: 4
The Criminal Law Clinic, which focuses on prosecution of misdemeanors and infractions, provides students with the opportunity to hone the skills necessary to become a successful prosecutor and litigator. Students will interview officers, victims and witnesses; draft correspondence and pleadings; develop case theory; and conduct arraignments, pre-trial conferences, and trials. The contemporaneous course will add depth and reflection to the fieldwork, including workshops on criminal procedure, legal ethics, trial advocacy, and other practical skills.
Prerequisites: LAW 613, LAW 614, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 691       CLINIC: HOUSING       Credits: 3-5
The Housing Clinic, which focuses on eviction defense, habitability and security deposits, provides students with the opportunity to hone the skills necessary to become a successful advocate and litigator. Students will interview clients and witnesses; draft correspondence and pleadings; develop case theory; negotiate with landlords; and conduct hearings and trials. The contemporaneous course will add depth and reflection to the fieldwork, including workshops on tenant rights, legal ethics, trial advocacy, and other practical skills.
Prerequisites: LAW 601 and LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher

LAW 692       CLINIC: IMMIGRATION       Credits: 3-5
The Immigration Clinic, which represents immigrants and refugees with pursuing naturalization or citizenship and other forms of relief from deportation, provides students with the opportunity to hone skills necessary to become a successful advocate. Students will interview clients; draft applications, correspondence and pleadings; develop case theory; negotiate with DHS; and conduct hearings. The contemporaneous course will add depth and reflection to the fieldwork, including workshops on immigrant rights, legal ethics, advocacy, and other practical skills.

PLAW 601      INTRODUCTION TO CONTRACTS       Credits: 0
This course is a pre-admission course taught in connection with the Admission by Performance (ABP) program. The course incorporates formative assessment of the prospective student’s ability to grasp the principles that govern the formation and performance of legally enforceable promises, focusing on concepts of the offer, acceptance and consideration for contract formation.

PLAW 602       INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL DISCOURSE AND ANALYSIS​       Credits: 0
This course is a pre-admission course taught in connection with the Admission by Performance (ABP) program. The course builds three foundational lawyering skills: reading, writing, and analysis.  It enables prospective students to read primary legal authorities effectively and to produce basic legal analysis that conforms to the accepted structure and conventions of legal discourse.

The course descriptions and corequisite information for LDR 189 and LDR 190 were listed only as REL 189 and REL 190 in the 2018-2019 Catalog. The additional information is as follows:

Corrected Information for LDR 189 & LDR 190


LDR 189     PRACTICES IN SPIRITUALITY AND SOCIAL CHANGE     Credit: 1
This seminar is paired with LDR 190 and serves as a laboratory experience for that class. Through immersive experiences and research the student will engage a social problem and work toward an equitable solution. The seminar is repeatable with unique subjects.
Corequisite: LDR 190

LDR 190     LEADERSHIP IN SPIRITUALITY AND SOCIAL CHANGE     Credit: 2
This course offers the student an opportunity to live out the mission of Concordia University. The student will explore the intersections of faith and life through open conversation on issues of science, society, law, and religion. Through hands-on projects, interaction with individuals who are catalysts for social change, and personal and theological reflection, the student will be better equipped to be a leader who serves societal transformation.
Corequisite: LDR 189


 

This degree was not originally included in the catalog.


Pre-Nursing (A.A.)

Introduction

Concordia is a Christian University preparing leaders for the transformation of society. The Associate of Arts in Pre-Nursing degree is a step along that path—preparing students to enter a BSN program and to eventually become a nurse. A student who completes the Pre-Nursing A.A., meeting the GPA requirements for entrance into the BSN program, is guaranteed an Admission Interview to the BSN program. This does NOT guarantee acceptance into the BSN program.

Admission Requirements

See Undergraduate>Undergraduate Programs>Admission for Admission requirements. There are no additional Admission requirements for the A.A. in Pre-Nursing. See General Transfer Policies on the Nursing (BSN) page for specific transfer information. Note: The latency policy will apply to the transfer of credit for application to both the Pre-Nursing A.A. and the BSN.

Program Requirements

Major Requirements – A.A. in Pre-Nursing (24)

Pre-Nursing Courses
BIO 211GENERAL BIOLOGY I WITH LAB 14
MTH 231RESEARCH AND STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES 13
BIO 284MICROBIOLOGY WITH LAB 13
BIO 364HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I WITH LAB 14
BIO 365HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II WITH LAB 14
PSY 321HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT3
ESS 462NUTRITION 13
Total Credits24

General Education Requirements – A.A. Pre-Nursing

Freshman (38)
Freshman Foundation (15)
WR 121ENGLISH COMPOSITION3
HUM 152HOW THE WEST CAME TO BE3
ESS 260HEALTH AND FITNESS FOR LIFE WITH LAB2
MTH 123COLLEGE ALGEBRA3
CHM 101CHEMISTRY FOR LIFE WITH LAB3
LDR 198CONCORDIA COMMITMENT1
Spiritual Formation (6)
REL 211HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT3
or REL 221 HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
REL 401NFAITH FOR LIFE3
Intercultural Experiences (5)
HUM 351NCHALLENGES OF GLOBAL DIVERSITY3
REL 371WORLD RELIGIONS2
Studies in Arts & Sciences (9)
PSY 201PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY3
CHM 102PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY WITH LAB 13
WR 308ADVANCED RESEARCH WRITING3
Elective (3)
Elective (upper or lower division)3
Total Credits38
Transfer Student (38)
Transfer Foundation (14)
WR 121ENGLISH COMPOSITION3
Humanities (Ex: Lit, World History, Music History)3
Physical Education2
MTH 123COLLEGE ALGEBRA 13
CHM 101CHEMISTRY FOR LIFE WITH LAB 13
Spiritual Formation (6)
REL 211HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT3
or REL 221 HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
REL 401NFAITH FOR LIFE3
Intercultural Experiences (5)
HUM 351NCHALLENGES OF GLOBAL DIVERSITY3
REL 371WORLD RELIGIONS2
Studies in Arts & Sciences (9)
PSY 201PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY3
CHM 102PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY WITH LAB 13
Writing above WR 1213
Elective (4)
Elective (upper or lower division)4
Total Credits38

Elective Requirements

A minimum of 62 credits are required to graduate with an associate's degree from Concordia-Portland. Enough elective credits must be taken to meet this requirement.

The student should be aware of the prerequisite courses needed for each major course. In many cases these prerequisites should be taken to satisfy the General Education requirements, especially in the Math and Science areas.

The student is responsible for completing the graduation requirements listed for the chosen major, including General Education and Elective credits, and other requirements as stated by the program. While it is the intent of the University to meet students' needs, it may be impossible to provide every possible class option needed by each student.

Graduation Requirements

  • Earn a total of at least 62 semester credits
    • At least 20 of the last 30 credits must be taken at Concordia-Portland
    • At least 50% of Pre-Nursing courses must be taken at Concordia-Portland
    • HUM 351N and REL 401N must be taken at Concordia-Portland
  • Earn a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00
    • No grade below a “C” will be accepted in a course that counts toward completion of the major. Students who receive a “C-” or lower in a major course must retake the course and earn a “C” or higher for the course to count toward completion of a major.
    • No grade below a “D” will be accepted in a course that counts toward completion of a general education requirement. Students who receive a “D-" or lower in a general education course must retake the course and earn a “D” or higher for the course to count toward completion of a general education requirement. Higher standards may apply for courses that are also prerequisites. 
  • Adhere to the University pass/no pass policy. Additional restrictions on pass/no pass may apply for students planning on applying to a Nursing program at the bachelor level 
  • Complete and submit an Application for Graduation

The following is corrected and additional information regarding Veteran Services at Concordia University:

Updated Veteran Services Information


Concordia recognized as a Military Friendly® School

Continuing its mission to provide veterans and their spouses with the finest choices for secondary education, Victory Media released the 2018-19 Military Friendly® Schools list. In its 17th year, the Military Friendly® Schools list has come to set the standard for higher education institutions to provide the best opportunities for veterans and their spouses. This prestigious list provides a comprehensive guide for veterans and their families using data sources from federal agencies, veteran students, and proprietary survey information from participating organizations. For more information on this award visit www.militaryfriendly.com.

Not previously included.


Accreditation

  • ...
  • Programs at Concordia University are approved by the State Approving Agency for the use of Veterans’ Education Benefits.
  • ...

Replaces similar wording found at catalog.cu-portland.edu/general-information/accreditation-associations-memberships/.


Veteran Education Benefits

Academic programs offered at Concordia are approved by Oregon's State Approving Agency. Veterans and other persons eligible for educational benefits may complete the education benefit application on the VA’s website www.gibill.va.gov. Students will receive confirmation (Certificate of Eligibility or CoE) from the VA regarding eligibility for education benefits. It is the student’s responsibility to send a copy of the CoE to Concordia University’s School Certifying Official in the Finance Office before benefits can be processed. Please note: a copy of the qualifying veteran’s DD-214 is also required for those no longer on active duty or for those students receiving Dependent Education Assistance (Chapter 35) benefits. Any veteran applying to receive GI Bill® benefits while attending Concordia University is required to obtain transcripts from all previously attended schools and submit them Concordia for review of prior credit. More information is available on www.cu-portland.edu/student-affairs/finance-office/veterans-benefits.

Footnote: GI Bill® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government website at www.benefits.va.gov/gibill.

Replaces similar wording found at catalog.cu-portland.edu/undergraduate/financial-assistance/.


Concordia's School Certifying Official (SCO)

Josh Grover
Veterans Benefits Specialist
Luther Hall - 200
503-493-6215
vets@cu-portland.edu

Not previously provided.