Course Descriptions – Law & Pre-Law

For a listing of the courses which 1) is alphabetical, 2) complies with ABA Standard 509(c), and 3) lists the graduation requirements met by each course, visit: https://law.cu-portland.edu/academics/academic-catalog/course-descriptions.

Law Course Descriptions 

LAW 601      CIVIL PROCEDURE I      Credits: 3

Civil Procedure I examines the civil litigation process of the federal courts, from the inception of the case by filing a complaint, to discovery of factual information, through trials and other resolutions, and finally to appeals of adverse judgments. The course also explores under what conditions parties may litigate a previously decided case or issue a second time in a new lawsuit.

LAW 602      CIVIL PROCEDURE II      Credits: 3

Civil Procedure II offers students an introduction to the fundamentals of the civil litigation in the Federal Courts of the United States. The course covers the following legal doctrines and rules: subject-matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, notice and opportunity to be heard, venue, forum non conveniens, and the Erie doctrine.

LAW 603      WRITING FOR THE BAR EXAM      Credit: 1

This course teaches the writing, analysis, and time-management skills needed for success on the essay portions of the Uniform Bar Exam—the Multistate Performance Test and the Multistate Essay Examination. This course supplements, but does not replace, a traditional commercial bar review course.

LAW 604      MOOT COURT COMPETITION      Credit: 1

Members of Concordia Law’s Moot Court competition team(s) will prepare for and compete in the oral argument portion of appellate advocacy competitions.
Prerequisites: LAW 671 with a P grade and Instructor approval.

LAW 605      CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I      Credits: 3

This course examines the rules governing the grants of power under Articles I, II and III, the limits on state power under Article IV, and limits on federal power expressed in the Ninth and Tenth Amendments.

LAW 606      CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II      Credits: 3

This course focuses on the individual rights guaranteed by the First Amendment and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. The course will cover equal protection, substantive due process, the religion clauses, and free speech clause.
Prerequisites: LAW 605 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 607      INTENSIVE LEGAL ANALYSIS      Credits: 3

Intensive Legal Analysis is designed to help students develop and refine the analysis and problem-solving skills that are required for optimal success in law school, the bar exam, and in the practice of law.
Prerequisites: LAW 623 with a 1.00 or higher or concurrent enrollment.

LAW 608      PROPERTY I      Credits: 3

This course covers the legal concept of real property. It includes a study of adverse possession, estates and future interests, the Rule Against Perpetuities, rights and obligations inherent in concurrent ownership of real property, and eminent domain and regulatory taking jurisprudence.

LAW 609      CONTRACTS I      Credits: 3

This course covers the principles that govern the formation and performance of legally enforceable promises. The focus for the first part of the two-semester course is on contract formation, including offer and acceptance; the concept of consideration, substitutes to consideration for enforcement of promises; the issues and challenges that arise during the period of contract negotiation; standard form contracts; and the statute of frauds.

LAW 610      CONTRACTS II      Credits: 3

This course covers the interpretation and enforcement of contracts.
Prerequisites: LAW 609 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 611      PRACTICUM: CONTRACTS      Credits: 2

This course introduces students to the techniques of negotiating and drafting business contracts with an emphasis on understanding the nexus between the deal and the contract. Students will gain hand-on experience advising clients in simulated situations, including understanding contractual concepts contained in most business contracts; translating the deal accurately; recognizing, negotiating and drafting nuances in language that change the deal; and delivering meaningful and ethical client service by adding value to the contract and deal.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 613      CRIMINAL LAW      Credits: 3

This course examines theories of criminal liability, essential elements of criminal responsibility, classifications of crimes, elements of crime at common law and by statute, defenses to criminal responsibility, and theories of punishment and consequence.

LAW 614      CRIMINAL PROCEDURE      Credits: 3

This course examines constitutional restraints on police practices, interactions during police stops, searches and seizures, arrests and interrogation, and rights conferred through the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments.

LAW 615      PRACTICUM: CRIMINAL LAW      Credits: 2

As roughly 95 percent of all criminal cases are resolved without going to trial, this course provides students hands-on experience in the pretrial phase of criminal prosecution and defense along with plea negotiation and sentencing. Students will develop skills, particularly those most difficult to obtain, like case assessment and strategy, charging decisions and prosecutorial discretion, identifying and addressing legal and ethical concerns, interviewing witnesses and clients, negotiating pleas, and arguing sentences.
Prerequisites: LAW 613 and LAW 614 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 616      CRIMINAL ADJUDICATION      Credits: 3

This course examines the adjudication phase of the criminal process, focusing primarily on the constitutional doctrines regulating the adjudicative process. The course will cover topics such as prosecutorial discretion, selective prosecution, grand juries, right to counsel, discovery, plea bargaining, jury rights, double jeopardy, and appeals.
Prerequisites: LAW 613 and LAW 614 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 617      EVIDENCE      Credits: 3

This course is structured to provide a theoretical and practical understanding of the law of evidence. It covers the rules and limitations in the Federal Rules of Evidence as well as testimonial immunities and privileges that determine what information can be presented in a legal proceeding.

LAW 618      FOUNDATIONS OF JUSTICE      Credits: 3

This course explores topics of human dignity, the social order, the role of the state, economic justice, and the place of morality in a pluralist society. The role of morality in these settings and in the life of a lawyer is seen through the lens of religious and secular readings, as well as through judicial opinions that implicate these topics. Emphasis on student presentation of opposing viewpoints in a cogent and respectful manner.
Prerequisites: LAW 606 and LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 619      PROPERTY      Credits: 4

This course examines the legal concept of real property, which emerges as a set of discrete rights in land enforceable as against others. The course also examines adverse possession, estates and future interests, the Rule Against Perpetuities, rights and obligations inherent in concurrent ownership of real property, landlord-tenant law, express and implied easements, nuisance law, land-use regulation, zoning law, eminent domain and regulatory taking jurisprudence.

LAW 620      PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY      Credits: 3

Professional Responsibility is designed to develop students’ substantive knowledge about attorney ethics and regulation and to prepare them to identify and respond to these issues in practice. The course covers in detail the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and other sources of law that regulate attorneys.

LAW 621      FEDERAL COURTS      Credits: 3

This course covers the sharing of power between the federal courts and the political branches of the federal government and the allocation of power between the federal and state judicial systems.
Prerequisites: LAW 601 and LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 622      PRACTICUM: LAW PRACTICE MANAGEMENT      Credits: 2

This course provides a general introduction to law practice management with an emphasis on solo and small firm practice. Students will explore issues relating to law firm business formation and governance, operations and facilities management, risk management, strategic planning, marketing, human resources, information and technology management, accounting, finance, and compensation, as well as case management, client management, practice management systems, legal ethics, and professionalism.

LAW 623      LEGAL RESEARCH & WRITING I      Credits: 3

Integrated instruction in the fundamentals of legal research, analysis, and writing of objective legal memoranda includes fact investigation, research strategies, problem solving, the relationship between research and analysis, effective strategies for written communication, principles of organization, clarity, and conciseness in legal writing, and understanding audience.

LAW 624      CIVIL RIGHTS      Credits: 3

This course will explore the substantive, ethical and strategic issues involved in litigating civil rights actions. This course will allow students to both learn basic principles of governmental liability/defenses and apply their knowledge of torts, constitutional law and civil procedure in a litigation setting.
Prerequisites: LAW 605 with a 1.00 or higher and LAW 606 with a 1.00 or higher or concurrent enrollment.

LAW 625      LEGAL RESEARCH & WRITING II      Credits: 3

Building on the research, writing, and analytical skills of LAW 623 LEGAL RESEARCH & WRITING I, students focus on persuasive writing as they produce trial or appellate briefs. Students present oral arguments in a courtroom setting. Includes research, citation, and writing workshops, and additional client communications and professionalism components. Offered in small sections to allow individual conferences with faculty members on writing assignments.
Prerequisites: LAW 623 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 626      TORTS I      Credits: 3

This course will provide an overview of intentional torts and defenses to them: negligence, including damages, proximate cause, and contributory and comparative negligence; and defenses to claims of negligence.

LAW 627      FOUNDATIONS OF LEGAL ANALYSIS      Credits: 3

This course develops fundamental lawyering skills: sorting detailed factual materials; analyzing statutory, case, and administrative materials; applying law to facts; identifying and resolving ethical dilemmas; communicating effectively in writing; and timely completing lawyering tasks. This course is designed to ensure that the student is practice-ready after graduation and will also aid in preparing the student for the Multi-State Performance Test portion of the bar exam.

LAW 628      EXTERNSHIP      Credits: 2-6

The externship program combines field work in a diversity of practice settings with a contemporaneous class, regularly scheduled tutorial, or other guided reflection designed to reinforce lawyering skills and the social and ethical responsibilities of the profession. Placements must be supervised by a lawyer and the work must be substantive legal work.

LAW 630      ADMINISTRATIVE LAW      Credits: 3

In this course, students will learn how administrative agencies function, including the procedural rules governing them, how courts interpret statutes creating them and review administrative decisions, how agencies provide expertise or the ability to act when conflict prevents legislative action, and limitations on the delegation of powers to administrative agencies.

LAW 631      ALW: LITIGATION PLANNING & DRAFTING      Credits: 3

This course covers both strategy and drafting through simulated litigation scenarios. It covers initial case evaluation, ethics in practice, drafting pleadings and discovery requests, affidavits, motions, proposed orders, trial briefs, and other documents lawyers produce. It provides students with an opportunity to both deepen and expand on the skills learned in LRW I and II, to evaluate and support a client's claim, and to sharpen the skills necessary to become a successful litigator.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, and LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 632      ALW: JUDICIAL WRITING      Credits: 2

This course focuses on the writing tasks done within the chambers of an appellate judge as well as ethics in practice. Students will step into the role of a judicial clerk in a mock setting, analyzing a record and briefing, researching the issues presented to the court, and producing a bench memorandum. After examining how judges decide cases and what attributes make exemplary opinions, students will transform the bench memorandum into a final opinion.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 633      CONFLICT OF LAWS      Credits: 3

Conflict of Laws examines problems that arise when disputes implicate the laws of multiple jurisdictions. When a case has a connection to more than one state (or more than one country), or involves the intersection of both state and federal interests, how should a court decide which law to apply and what tribunals can hear a case?
Prerequisites: LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 634      PRACTICUM: ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION      Credits: 2

This course examines the variety of processes and techniques designed to help disagreeing parties come to an agreement short of litigation. The most commonly used alternative dispute resolution (ADR) systems are negotiation, mediation, collaborative law, and arbitration. Students will explore the role lawyers often play in ADR processes, either by advising clients on and representing them in proceedings, or by serving as adjudicators, arbitrators, conciliators, and/or mediators.
Prerequisites: LAW 601 and LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 635      BANKRUPTCY      Credits: 3

This course examines federal bankruptcy as it relates to individuals and businesses. Topics included are bankruptcy court structure, bankruptcy eligibility, property of the bankruptcy estate, the automatic stay, exempt property, non-dischargeable debts, bankruptcy plans, treatment of contracts and leases, the powers of the trustee, liquidating assets, treatment of secured and unsecured claims, and the intersection of bankruptcy law and other areas of law, such as family law, intellectual property law, and corporate law.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 636      BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS      Credits: 4

This course examines the laws governing modern business entities, including agency, partnership, and limited liability companies. The course also examines legal issues relevant to the control and management of a corporation, with a focus on public corporations. This course serves as a gateway to further study of transactional and business law through other elective courses.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 637      PRACTICUM: BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS      Credits: 2

This course addresses the various legal, ethical, and practical issues that arise when representing businesses as clients through the vehicle of a hypothetical start-up entity(ies). Students will gain hands-on experience advising and representing clients in simulated business situations, including engaging in client consultation, interviewing, and counseling; drafting client advice documents; evaluating corporate structures; incorporating an entity; and financing a start-up business.
Prerequisites: LAW 636 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 638      MOCK TRIAL      Credits: 2

The workshop course provides students an opportunity to implement classroom theory through simulating the trial process. Students will participate in teams and will develop a litigation strategy based on a real-life problem and then present their case before a panel of lawyers and judges. The competition allows students to develop and hone courtroom skills, such as opening and closing argument, witness preparation, direct examination, cross examination, objections to evidence, demonstrative evidence and ethics in practice.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, LAW 613, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 640      EMPLOYMENT LAW      Credits: 3

This course will help students understand the basic framework of U.S. employment law. It will cover topics such as race, sex, religion, disability, and age discrimination, wage and hour laws and laws covering employee privacy, workers compensation, unemployment insurance, immigration, and safety and health.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 641      ENVIRONMENTAL LAW      Credits: 3

Students will gain an introduction to environmental law. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 642      FAMILY LAW      Credits: 3

In this course, students will learn the fundamental framework governing marriage, divorce, parenting, child support, property distribution, and spousal maintenance.

LAW 643      AGRICULTURE LAW      Credits: 3

This course provides an overview and introduction to agricultural law. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, U.S. agricultural regulation, U.S. agricultural policy, farm subsidies and assistance programs, livestock production and animal welfare, food safety, and biotechnology. The course may also discuss property law, labor law, immigration law, and environmental law as they relate to agricultural production, distribution, and marketing.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 644      IMMIGRATION LAW      Credits: 3

This course examines the entry, presence, expulsion, and naturalization of noncitizens, and the content and significance of U.S. citizenship and nationality. Specific topics will include Congress’ plenary power over immigration; the interaction between immigration and federalism; the constitutional rights of noncitizens; the criteria for the admission of noncitizens; the grounds for exclusion and deportation; the rules governing adjustment of status; and the law governing, refugees and asylees.

LAW 645      EDUCATION LAW      Credits: 3

This course will address the fundamental framework governing education law through exploration of cases, legislation, and regulations. Students will also discuss current issues facing the education system in Idaho and the Northwest.

LAW 646      INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY      Credits: 3

This is a survey course of intellectual property law. The course will provide students with an introduction to principles of intellectual law. The course will cover basic principles of trade secret, patent, copyright, trademark, and publicity rights law along with other topics as time allows.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 647      INTERNATIONAL LAW      Credits: 3

This course will serve as a basic introduction to the rules, procedures, institutions and actors that are involved in the development, enforcement, and adjudication of public international law.

LAW 648      FEDERAL INDIAN LAW      Credits: 3

This course will examine the history and fundamentals of Federal Indian Law in the United States from European contact to the present day. The course will explore the law governing the relationships between the Indian tribes, the federal government, and the states. Topics include the federal-tribal relationship, tribal sovereignty, civil and criminal jurisdiction for both members and non-members of the tribes, protection of religious practices and sacred sites, gaming, Indian land rights and environmental issues.

LAW 649      CORPORATE TAX      Credits: 3

This course examines the taxation of corporations and their shareholders focusing on corporate formation, capital structure, non-liquidating distributions, liquidations, reorganizations, and the treatment of tax attributes. Theories of tax policy are discussed throughout the semester. Practical application of economic theories relevant to transactional law practice are framed throughout the course.
Prerequisites: LAW 636 and LAW 657 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 650      PROPERTY II      Credits: 3

This course includes the study of a real estate transactions; deeds and mortgages; forms of title assurance, title covenants, and title insurance; the recording system and the recording statutes; landlord/tenant law; nuisance law; and the law of fixtures.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 651      MENTORSHIP      Credits: .5

Through the mentorship program, students are paired with lawyers and judges in the community who will expose them to a wide range of lawyering tasks and the ethical responsibilities of the profession. Second and third year students will participate in an academic credit program that combines field observation and networking with a contemporaneous workshop.

LAW 653      PRACTICUM: LAW PRACTICE TECHNOLOGY      Credits: 2

Through this course, students will receive hands-on training in a number of key operational aspects of the practice of law, including virtual law firm structures and management; security and confidentiality of client information; marketing, public relations, advertising and social media; duties of technological competence; predictive coding and other eDiscovery issues; client intake and case management; and issues related to the scope and composition of representation including the unauthorized practice of law and unbundled legal services.

LAW 654      BAR EXAM PLANNING      Credit: 1

This course familiarizes students with the components of the bar exam, the application process, and evidence-based learning strategies necessary for effective bar exam preparation. In addition, this course teaches multiple choice strategy, integrating substantive review of at least one topic tested on the multiple-choice component of the exam.
Prerequisites: LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 655      REMEDIES      Credits: 3

The course covers remedies—damages, restitution, and declaratory and injunctive relief—how courts chose among them. The damages material includes reliance, expectation, and punitive damages, and techniques for proving damages, including special damages in excess of market values. The material on injunctive relief includes specific restitution, preventive injunctions, and the requirements for preliminary relief and permanent injunctions.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 610, and LAW 626 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 656      PRACTICUM: TAX RESEARCH AND PLANNING      Credits: 2

This course builds upon the legal research skills obtained during the first-year legal writing and research program by concentrating on tax research and the application of the research to tax problems. Utilizing realistic fact-based scenarios, students will gain knowledge of both primary and secondary sources in print and online used in tax research with the aim to develop students into competent and ethical tax researchers.
Prerequisites: LAW 657 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 657      FEDERAL INCOME TAX      Credits: 3

This course examines Federal Income Taxation of the individual. It includes basic principles of the federal income tax—including concepts of gross income, exclusions, deductions, elements of tax procedure, judicial review, and tax research. Tax concepts and theories of tax policy are discussed throughout the semester. Practical application of economic theories relevant to transactional law practice are framed throughout the course.

LAW 658      TORTS II      Credits: 3

This course covers the rules imposing strict liability on dangerous activities and products and the transitions that created modern strict liability. Students will learn the doctrinal rules and to make arguments about liability based in social justice and policy, enabling them to be better lawyers, lobbyists, judges, or legislators.
Prerequisites: LAW 626 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 659      PRACTICUM: TRIAL PRACTICE AND ADVOCACY      Credits: 2

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning how to select a jury, properly examine witnesses, conduct a trial, and litigate a case. Students will gain hand-on experience in trial strategy, jury selection, direct and cross examination, objections to evidence, demonstrative evidence, pre-trial motions, opening statements, ethics in practice, and final arguments.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 660      SECURED TRANSACTIONS      Credits: 2

This course introduces students to all aspects of security interests in personal property collateral and enforcement of security interests. This course will emphasize the use of problems as a primary means of learning how to use the code and counsel hypothetical creditor or debtor clients in both transactional and litigation situations.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 661      WATER LAW      Credits: 3

Water Law will explore in depth the law governing the allocation and administration of water resources. Although students will gain a general understanding of riparian law as it functions in the Eastern United States, this course will focus primarily on water law as it operates in the Western United States.

LAW 662      WILLS, TRUSTS & ESTATES      Credits: 3

Wills, Trusts and Estates considers basic estate planning tools for individuals and families. This course will examine both the law and the policy animating the law and the ethical issues that lawyers in this field confront daily.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 663      PRACTICUM: ESTATE PLANNING      Credits: 2

Through simulated practice experiences, this course presents problems in estate analysis, planning, and execution. Students will plan an estate from the interview stage, to the drafting of wills and trusts, to the implementation of the estate plan. Students will explore various topics, including minimizing estate and gift taxes, trusts for minors, charitable giving, disposition of a family business, incapacity, stepfamilies and non-traditional families, legal ethics, and valuation.
Prerequisites: LAW 662 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 664      ALW: INTENSIVE LEGAL WRITING      Credits: 2

This course covers ethics, strategy, and drafting through simulated scenarios. It may cover drafting office memorandum, legislation, contracts, complaints, affidavits, motions, proposed orders, trial briefs, and other documents lawyers produce. It will provide students with an opportunity to both deepen and expand on the skills learned in LRW I and II, to evaluate and support a client's claim, and to sharpen the skills necessary to become a successful litigator.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 665      ALW: ADVANCED APPELLATE ADVOCACY      Credits: 2

This course provides students with an opportunity to hone their brief writing skills to become more effective and ethical advocates though simulated scenarios. The course provides valuable skills regarding organization of legal arguments and effective presentation. The course is valuable for students who intend on participating in moot court competitions, but it will also provide students with an opportunity to hone their appellate litigation skills, which are necessary to becoming a successful practitioner.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 667      PRACTICUM: EVIDENCE      Credits: 2

This course is a practical skills course of the rules governing the admissibility or exclusion of evidence at trial. Subjects include competency of witnesses, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, the rule against hearsay and its exceptions, expert and lay opinion testimony, privileged communications, relevancy, procedural considerations, burden of proof, presumptions, form and type of objections, authentication, the best evidence rule, legal ethics, and the use of demonstrative and scientific evidence.
Prerequisites: LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher or concurrent enrollment.

LAW 668      PRACTICUM: ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH      Credits: 2

This course builds upon the legal research skills obtained during the first-year legal writing and research program to create advanced and ethical researchers. Utilizing realistic fact-based scenarios, students will have an opportunity to use their more advanced legal analysis skills to complete more complicated and nuanced research tasks that more closely mimic real-world research and analysis undertaken by lawyers.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 669      ALW: RHETORIC      Credits: 3

This course introduces advanced theories and practices of persuasion in legal communication through simulated scenarios. Students survey the leading theories of persuasion, including both classical and contemporary rhetoric; critically analyze briefs and opinions to assess the authors’ use of persuasive methods and strategies as well as the audience’s response; and draft and revise two sections of a persuasive brief. The course develops students’ the ability to make deliberate, effective, and ethical persuasive choices.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 671      MOOT COURT      Credit: 1

Members of Concordia Law’s Moot Court competition team(s) will prepare for the brief submission portion of the appellate advocacy competitions. Students will grapple with at least one hypothetical appeal to an appellate court, researching complex issues, engaging in critical thinking and problem solving, and developing case strategy.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 672      PRACTICUM: DEPOSITION      Credits: 2

This course introduces students to the important skills of preparing for, conducting, defending, and using depositions in civil litigation. Students will gain hands-on experience ethically conducting and defending depositions on behalf of clients on simulated situations.
Prerequisites: LAW 601, LAW 602, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 673      NATURAL RESOURCES      Credits: 3

The course covers major federal statutes dealing with natural resources law. Specific topics may include mining law, oil and gas law, water law, public land law, energy law, and the legal treatment of wildlife, biodiversity, fisheries, marine resources, forests, and rangelands. Students will be able to formulate both legal and non-legal strategies for resolving natural resources law issues while gaining an understanding of ethical and economic concerns related to natural resource management and protection.
Prerequisites: LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 674      OIL & GAS LAW      Credits: 3

This course addresses the ownership, development, and conservation of oil and gas. It emphasizes real property and contract law concepts unique to oil and gas law and the relationships among landowners and oil and gas companies involved in exploration and production of oil and gas. It covers oil and gas legal terms, mineral rights, conveyances, oil and gas leases, and title issues, and federal and state administrative regulation.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 and LAW 608 or LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 675      REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS      Credits: 3

The course studies the legal issues that arise in real estate transactions. Those legal issues include a study of purchase contracts, closing transactions, and liabilities that follow closure. The course covers the recording system, titles, mortgages, default and foreclosure.
Prerequisites: LAW 619 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 676      PRACTICUM: REAL ESTATE      Credits: 2

This course introduces modern transactional real estate practice with a focus on commercial real estate transactions. Students will learn to prepare and revise documents used in commercial real estate transactions. Discussions and assignments will be based upon simulated fact patterns and mock negotiations. Students will identify legal, ethical and business issues that arise in the preparation and revision of documents, and how to structure and negotiate transactions, engage with clients, and resolve disputes.
Prerequisites: LAW 619 or LAW 650 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 677      INTERNET LAW      Credits: 3

This course examines the major legal issues surrounding the Internet and its role in today’s society. Major topics include: the special jurisdictional issues with the Internet; contracts; trespass and the Computer Fraud & Abuse Act (CFAA); intellectual property (copyright, trademark and domain names); pornography; defamation and information torts; privacy; spam; blogs and social networking sites; and other timely Internet issues as the schedule allows.

LAW 678      ALW: LOGIC & NARRATIVE      Credits: 2

Through this course, students will be able to identify and use the basics of logic and its application to legal reasoning. Students will also be able to identify various forms of narrative devises and their application to legal writing as well as apply the techniques learned to their legal writing.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 679      SPORTS LAW      Credits: 3

This course will cover legal issues pertaining to both professional and amateur team sports. Representative issues include: labor issues; antitrust issues, individual player-club contract issues; constitutional issues; gender equity issues; and disability discrimination issues. This course provides an analysis of the sports industries and the laws which regulate or fail to regulate their functions and behavior. The course will also cover health, safety, and risk management issues in these sports.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 680      SECOND AMENDMENT SEMINAR      Credits: 2

This course is an intensive, seminar-driven inquiry into the history, operation and controversy surrounding gun control and Second Amendment law and debate. Through the conception, drafting, execution and presentation of a substantial term paper, students will increase their drafting, research, writing and presentation skills.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 681      LAW REVIEW SCHOLARSHIP      Credit: 1

Members of the Concordia Law Review will research and write a
note or comment suitable for publication under the guidance of faculty members. Students will develop an understanding of legal scholarship, as well as impart the significance and societal role of academic legal research.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 682      LAW REVIEW PRODUCTION      Credit: 1

Members of the Concordia Law Review select, edit and publish high-quality, general legal scholarship by creating one or more law review issues. Students will develop an understanding of the legal publishing process, as well as the significance and societal role of academic legal research.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher and Instructor approval.

LAW 683      INSURANCE LAW      Credits: 3

This course covers the fundamental framework governing insurance law through exploration of cases, legislation, regulations, and law reform proposals.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 684      ALW: LEGISLATIVE DRAFTING      Credits: 2

This course introduces students to the forms and conventions of legislative drafting to conceptualize legislative solutions to real-world problems through simulated scenarios. The course refines students’ ability to analyze statutes, introduces theories of statutory interpretation and canons of construction, and deepens research skills. It also builds on skills learned in LRW I and II to develop the reasoning, writing, research, and other communication skills crucial to becoming successful lawyers.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 685      COMPLEX LITIGATION      Credits: 2

This course helps students learn how to advocate for their clients in complex litigation, including selecting appropriate forums and way for resolving disputes, advocating for and against class action certification, using expert witnesses, e-discovery, and arranging for settlement and fees.
Prerequisites: LAW 602 and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 686      LEADERSHIP IN LAW      Credits: 2,3

This course considers the dynamics of power and leadership in the judiciary, law firms, the corporate world, and legal education. It introduces students to theories of leadership and explores the intersections of gender, race, class, power, leadership, and law. The course explores the leadership landscape, identifies, and considers solutions to overcome, potential obstacles to advancement, considers what it means to be an effective leader, and explores proposed strategies for being an effective leader.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 687      HEALTH LAW      Credits: 3

This course examines the regulation, structure, and financing of the American health care system, including public and private insurance, access to low income and uninsured, and fraud and abuse laws.

LAW 688      WORKERS' COMPENSATION LAW      Credits: 3

This course will provide the law student with a broad understanding of the workers’ compensation system in use today established to compensate and treat injured workers involved in work accidents.

LAW 689      SUCCESS SKILLS      Credit: 1

This course familiarizes students with the process of legal education and introduces the foundational skills required for optimal law school performance. The course covers evidence-based learning strategies, reading and briefing cases,
notetaking, synthesizing rules, creating course outlines, and drafting legal analysis in the context of the law school exam.
Corequisites: LAW 601 or LAW 609 or LAW 613 or LAW 626 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 690      CLINIC: CRIMINAL LAW      Credits: 4

The Criminal Law Clinic, which focuses on prosecution of misdemeanors and infractions, provides students with the opportunity to hone the skills necessary to become a successful prosecutor and litigator. Students will interview officers, victims and witnesses; draft correspondence and pleadings; develop case theory; and conduct arraignments, pre-trial conferences, and trials. The contemporaneous course will add depth and reflection to the fieldwork, including workshops on criminal procedure, legal ethics, trial advocacy, and other practical skills.
Prerequisites: LAW 613, LAW 614, and LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 691      CLINIC: HOUSING      Credits: 3-5

The Housing Clinic, which focuses on eviction defense, habitability and security deposits, provides students with the opportunity to hone the skills necessary to become a successful advocate and litigator. Students will interview clients and witnesses; draft correspondence and pleadings; develop case theory; negotiate with landlords; and conduct hearings and trials. The contemporaneous course will add depth and reflection to the fieldwork, including workshops on tenant rights, legal ethics, trial advocacy, and other practical skills.
Prerequisites: LAW 601 and LAW 602 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 692      CLINIC: IMMIGRATION      Credits: 3-5

The Immigration Clinic, which represents immigrants and refugees with pursuing naturalization or citizenship and other forms of relief from deportation, provides students with the opportunity to hone skills necessary to become a successful advocate. Students will interview clients; draft applications, correspondence and pleadings; develop case theory; negotiate with DHS; and conduct hearings. The contemporaneous course will add depth and reflection to the fieldwork, including workshops on immigrant rights, legal ethics, advocacy, and other practical skills.

LAW 693      ALW: MOTION PRACTICE      Credits: 2

This course covers drafting pleadings commonly used in criminal law practice through simulated scenarios. It covers both pre- and post-trial motions and ethics in practice It provides students with an opportunity to both deepen and expand on the skills learned in LRW I and II, and to sharpen the skills necessary to become a successful prosecutor or defense attorney.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 694      APPLIED LEGAL METHODS      Credit: 1

This course teaches law school self-regulated learning in the context of a 1L doctrinal course. Students will learn to read effectively, synthesize legal rules, and memorialize a synthesis of rules in an outline, mindmap, or similar study tool. Students will also refine exam analysis skills, practicing essay and multiple choice questions tied to the doctrinal course content.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

LAW 695      PRINCIPLES OF LEGAL ANALYSIS      Credit: 1

This course focuses on the Multistate Performance Test (MPT), a component of the bar exam. The course will provide multiple opportunities to draft and refine legal analysis. Students will develop foundational analysis skills, such as connecting rule structure to writing structure, rule synthesis, rule based reasoning and analogical reasoning. Students will utilize self-reflection exercises and instructor feedback to improve upon their work.
Prerequisites: LAW 623 with a 1.00 or higher and Instructor approval.

LAW 696      BAR EXAM BOOT CAMP      Credits: 2

This course familiarizes students with the components of the bar exam, the application process, and evidence-based learning strategies necessary for effective bar exam preparation. In addition, this course teaches multiple choice strategy, time-management skills, and the writing and analysis needed for success on the essay portions of the Uniform Bar Exam. This course supplements, but does not replace, a traditional commercial bar review course.
Prerequisites: LAW 617 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 697      CYBERSECURITY & DATA PRIVACY      Credits: 3

This course examines legal issues facing individuals and organizations in the digital information economy, including consumer protection, privacy, data security, net neutrality, and antitrust. Students will study the economics of information, the Federal Trade Commission’s role in the information economy, the interplay between regulation of the digital economy and the First Amendment, competition policy and online platforms, the net neutrality debate, and EU perspectives on security and privacy regulation.

LAW 699      INDEPENDENT STUDY      Credit: 1,2

The independent study option is designed to serve students who have significant research interests that cannot be explored in the context of regularly-scheduled seminars with a research paper component. Independent study proposals should be developed out of engagement in upper-level coursework as an advanced research project on the subject matter of interest. Faculty members may supervise independent study projects undertaken in a student’s fourth semester or thereafter.
Prerequisites: LAW 625 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 700      EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION      Credits: 3

This course will give students a comprehensive understanding of employment discrimination under federal statutes and of the issues that arise in proving such cases and providing a remedy for violations.
Prerequisites: LAW 606 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 701      LAW & SOCIETY      Credits: 2

Through reflective self-analysis students learn how lawyers situate their work and law in its social context; the ways in which law shapes society, culture, and politics, and ways society, culture, and politics shape the law; and ways to help change unjust laws and aspects of society using the law.

LAW 702      NONPROFIT LAW      Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to nonprofit organizations and the issues they face. The course study state laws that affect nonprofits: formation, dissolution and operational issues, including the duties of care and loyalty faced by directors and trustees. The course will also examine federal income tax laws applicable to tax exempt organizations.
Prerequisites: LAW 610 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 703      TAXATION OF BUSINESS ENTITIES      Credits: 3

This course examines the taxation of corporations, partnerships, and limited liability companies. It introduces students to the different business forms recognized by state law and to the different business tax regimes applied to these business entities. The course focuses on comparing and contrasting the various business tax regimes. Theories of tax policy are discussed during the semester.
Prerequisites: LAW 657 with a 1.00 or higher.

LAW 704      PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY      Credit: 1

Professional Identity introduces and explores the professional competencies that lead to a satisfying and successful professional career. This course introduces students to reflective self-analysis on the process of professional identity formation by considering individual values, strengths, and interests, examining the culture and expectations of the profession, and developing the key tools and strategies necessary to succeed within the legal profession.

LAW 705      PROFESSIONAL MENTORSHIP      Credits: 0

Through the Professional Mentorship program, students are paired with lawyers and judges in the community who will expose them to a wide range of lawyering tasks and the ethical responsibilities of the profession.
Prerequisites: LAW 704 with a 1.00 or higher or a P.

Pre-Law Course Descriptions

PLAW 601      INTRODUCTION TO CONTRACTS      Credits: 0

This course is a pre-admission course taught in connection with the Admission by Performance (ABP) program. The course incorporates formative assessment of the prospective students’ ability to grasp the principles that govern the formation and performance of legally enforceable promises, focusing on concepts of the offer, acceptance and consideration for contract formation.

PLAW 602      INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL DISCOURSE AND ANALYSIS      Credits: 0

This course is a pre-admission course taught in connection with the Admission by Performance (ABP) program. The course builds three foundational lawyering skills: reading, writing, and analysis. It enables prospective students to read primary legal authorities effectively and to produce basic legal analysis that conforms to the accepted structure and conventions of legal discourse.