Nursing (BSN)

Mission

Concordia University's Nursing Program builds upon scientific preparation and liberal studies to develop clinical competence and reflective compassion. We strive to prepare nurses who practice evidenced-based care, promote health, and provide leadership within healthcare organizations and the community. 

The program was founded on the belief that nursing is a Christian calling. The practice of compassion is emphasized throughout the program, and cultural competence is systematically developed to prepare nurses committed to caring for diverse populations. The program develops student competence and confidence in practice skills and deliberately intertwines pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical reasoning, and understanding of the human experience of illness to develop strong practice judgment. An intensive clinical preceptorship occurs in the final semester. Key curricular concepts include ethical reasoning and evidence based care.

Program Accreditation

The Concordia Nursing Program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and fully approved by the Oregon State Board of Nursing. Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Council Licensure Examinations (NCLEX-RN) which all nursing candidates in the United States must pass to become Registered Nurses.

Program Objectives

Graduates of Concordia University-Portland’s Nursing Program will:

  1. Use intrapersonal spiritual principles to guide personal and professional nursing responses when engaged in health care delivery that respects spiritual beliefs, cultural and individual differences, and the values of self and others.
  2. Collaborate with varied cultures, organizations, and communities promoting mutual projects for health promotion, policy development, and accessibility for the underserved.
  3. Communicate effectively by means of therapeutic and collaborative listening, recognizing the value, application, and ethical responsibilities when communicating through multiple technologies using professional language in diverse situations.
  4. Engage in leadership roles promoting safety and quality care in health care settings, illustrative of altruism, autonomy, human dignity, integrity, and social justice while working with organizational systems and regulatory environments.
  5. Use complex thinking to analyze holistic health needs of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations across the lifespan in various practice settings implementing evidence-based, patient-centered systems for optimizing health outcomes.

Modalities

On-Ground Program (BSN)

Concordia University has a fully on-ground Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) curriculum that is completed in two years using a cohort model. Full-time enrollment is required; currently there is not a part-time option.

Accelerated Hybrid Program (ABSN)

Concordia University offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) in an accelerated format (hereafter referred to as ABSN) that is completed in sixteen months using a cohort model. The curriculum is a combination of online didactic coursework, and hands-on experiential learning and clinical rotations. Full-time enrollment is required;currently there is not a part-time option.

Admission: Pre-Nursing Program

Admission to the on-ground BSN Freshman Advantage Program

For admission into the BSN Freshman Advantage Program, follow the Undergraduate Admission process in the Undergraduate Admission section. Currently, BSN Freshman Advantage program admission also requires the following:

  • Submit two letters of recommendation, preferably from science or math teachers who can attest to your qualifications as a strong candidate for Concordia’s nursing program.
  • Provide a word-processed essay on “Why I Want to Become a Nurse” (250-500 words)
  • Submit any of the following optional items: Additional letters of recommendation, documentation of volunteer experience in health care, academic honors if any, and extra-curricular involvement.

BSN Freshman Advantage Program Benchmarks

Concordia University freshmen, who have been admitted to the BSN Freshman Advantage Program, and who have successfully completed all benchmarks as described below, DO NOT have to apply separately for acceptance into the upper division BSN program.

  • Maintain a 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all classes. This benchmark must be met at the end of the freshman year and at the end of every subsequent semester, until full acceptance into the BSN upper division program.
  • Maintain a 3.25 minimum GPA in math and science classes, including College Algebra (MTH 123), Statistics (MTH 231), Chemistry 101, Chemistry 102, Biology 211, Microbiology (BIO 284), Anatomy (BIO 364), and Physiology (BIO 365). This benchmark must be met at the end of the freshman year and at the end of every subsequent semester, until full acceptance into the BSN upper division program.
  • Demonstrate evidence of good citizenship and responsibility while on campus.
  • Must be continuously enrolled as a full-time student at Concordia University-Portland during the Fall and Spring semesters.
  • Once students begin taking courses at Concordia University-Portland, all remaining Natural Science courses (CHM 101, CHM 102, BIO 211, BIO 284, BIO 364, & BIO 365) must be completed at Concordia University-Portland.
  • Must complete an Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course prior to the start of the BSN upper division program.

BSN Freshman Advantage students are notified in early spring of their sophomore year (junior year for students on the 5 year plan) whether they have satisfactorily met the above criteria and can proceed with the BSN program. Grades for at least four science classes and College Algebra should be available at that time. BSN Freshman Advantage Program students who have not met the benchmarks above but have maintained at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and a minimum 3.0 math and science grade point average may apply to the BSN program via the Nursing Admit to Major process.

Admission as an on-ground Pre-Nursing Student (non-Freshman Advantage) 

For admission to Concordia University-Portland as an on-ground Pre-Nursing Student (freshman or transfer student), follow the Undergraduate Admission process in the Undergraduate Admission section at www.applytocu.com, and select "Pre-Nursing" as your desired major.

On-ground Pre-Nursing Student Benchmarks (non-Freshman Advantage)

Students studying at Concordia University as an on-ground Pre-Nursing students, with the exception of students in the BSN Freshman Advantage Program, must meet all of the following requirements to be eligible to apply to the BSN program via the Nursing Admit to Major process.

  • Maintain a 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all classes.
  • Maintain a 3.0 minimum GPA in math and science classes, including College Algebra (MTH 123), Statistics (MTH 231), Chemistry 101, Chemistry 102, Biology 211, Microbiology (BIO 284), Anatomy (BIO 364), and Physiology (BIO 365).
  • Demonstrate evidence of good citizenship and responsibility while on campus.
  • Must be a Concordia University-Portland student during the entire academic year (Fall and Spring semesters) immediately prior to the start of the BSN program.
  • Must complete an Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course prior to the start of the BSN upper division program.

On-ground Concordia Pre-Nursing students are notified early in the spring semester whether they have satisfactorily met the above criteria and can proceed with the Nursing Admit to Major (ATM) process. The ATM process is a competitive process, and qualifying for the ATM process does not guarantee admission into the BSN program.

Admission as a Pre-ABSN Student

Students applying to Concordia University-Portland as a Pre-Nursing Student planning to pursue the accelerated BSN program must meet all of the following requirements to be eligible to apply to the ABSN program via the Nursing Admit to Major process.

  • Have completed at least 12 credits of college-level courses
  • Maintain a 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all classes.
  • Maintain a 3.0 minimum GPA in math and science classes, including College Algebra (MTH 123), Statistics (MTH 231), Chemistry 101, Chemistry 102, Biology 211, Microbiology (BIO 284), Anatomy (BIO 364), and Physiology (BIO 365).
  • Must complete an Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course prior to the start of the BSN upper division program.

Admission: BSN Program

BSN Student Benchmarks

All BSN applicants (on-ground and accelerated) must meet all of the following requirements to be eligible to apply to the BSN or ABSN program:

  • All General Education courses and Nursing prerequisites must be completed with:
    • 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all classes.
    • 3.0 minimum GPA in math and science classes, including College Algebra (MTH 123), Statistics (MTH 231), Chemistry 101, Chemistry 102, Biology 211, Microbiology (BIO 284), Anatomy (BIO 364), and Physiology (BIO 365).
  • Must complete an Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course prior to the start of the BSN upper division program.

Applicants are notified whether they have satisfactorily met the above criteria and can proceed with the Nursing application process. The application process is competitive and qualifying to apply does not guarantee admission into the program.

Admission to the on-ground BSN Program

For admission to Concordia's on-ground BSN program, all candidates who are not current CU pre-nursing students, must meet the above listed benchmarks and must complete the standard Transfer Admission Process before March 15, for a comprehensive faculty review. The highly competitive review process will examine grades, standardized exam scores, and personal qualities identified in a required interview and professional résumé. BSN candidates are encouraged to begin submitting applications for the upcoming fall BSN cohort beginning November 1 of the preceding year. BSN candidates must complete the application process by March 15, and must complete an Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course before the fall entrance.

Admission to the accelerated BSN Program (ABSN)

For admission to Concordia's accelerated nursing program, all candidates must meet the above listed benchmarks and, in conjunction with their enrollment specialist, complete the following:

  1. An updated copy of professional résumé.
  2. Proof of academic readiness by providing one of the following:
    1. Official transcripts from all institutions previously attended (Concordia students must submit only transcripts from other institutions attended since they began attending at CU)
    2. Results of the Kaplan test for those who have not previously earned a bachelor's degree
  3. Evidence of completing a Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course
  4. Documentation of completed general education and prerequisite courses through an Official Transcript Evaluation conducted by Concordia's Office of the Registrar.

There are three cohort starts each year: January, late April or early May, and August. Contact Concordia's Office of Online Admission for more details and an admissions process timeline.

General Transfer Policies

Nursing Transfer Guides

Concordia University provides Nursing-specific transfer guides for local schools on the Concordia University website. Students should follow these guides, in addition to consultation with a CU Transfer Admission Counselor. Any courses not outlined on the transfer guides will be evaluated for content equivalency.

Transfer Biology Prerequisites

Students seeking admission to the BSN or ABSN program at CU, and who will transfer in the course equivalents for all three higher-level nursing prerequisite biology courses (BIO 284, BIO 364, and BIO 365), may fulfill BIO 211 with any 100-level or higher human biology course with a lab; the course must be/have been taken for a letter grade.

Post-Baccalaureate Biology & Chemistry Prerequisites

Students, who have completed a baccalaureate degree prior to seeking admission to the BSN or ABSN program at CU, may fulfill BIO 211 with one year or 100-level or higher human biology coursework with a lab; the course must be/have been taken for a letter grade.

Similarly, for the post-baccalaureate student, CHM 101 & CHM 102 may be fulfilled with 1 year of 100-level or higher chemistry coursework, with a lab.

Latency Policy

Transfer credits will be accepted which meet the following criteria:

  • Math coursework – 10 year or younger
  • Science coursework – 7 years or younger

Note: Latency is counted from the year (regardless of month or term) the student starts at CU – not the cohort start – and goes back to the year the coursework was completed.

Curricular Requirements

On-Ground BSN

Prior to acceptance into the BSN program, all Nursing prerequisite courses, electives, and General Education requirements must be met, except REL 401, HUM 351, and PE which may be taken concurrently with the program.

Accelerated BSN

Prior to acceptance into the ABSN program, all Nursing prerequisite courses, electives, and General Education requirements must be met, except REL 401, HUM 351 and PE, which may be taken concurrently with the ABSN program. Note, however, that it is strongly recommended that the ABSN student complete all non-nursing coursework prior to the program start.

Donna Bachand, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Professor, dbachand@cu-portland.edu

Dawn Bock, M.S.N., Nursing Skills/Simulation Lab Faculty, dbock@cu-portland.edu

Debra Cohen, M.S.N., Assistant Professor, decohen@cu-portland.edu

HollyAnne Heaton, M.N., Assistant Professor, hheaton@cu-portland.edu

Donald (Don ) W. Mitchell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, dmitchell@cu-portland.edu

Mary Ann Oakes, M.S.N., Nursing Skills/Simulation Lab Faculty, moakes@cu-portland.edu

Lisa J. Mariea Presnall, ND/D.N.P., Interim Chair HCA, Professor, lpresnall@cu-portland.edu

NUR 350      FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND CARING FOR PERSONS WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS      Credits: 4

This course introduces concepts of professional nursing practice. The course focuses on persons and families experiencing the impact of chronic illness and disease, including chronic mental health conditions. The course will integrate concepts of spiritual and cultural influences on care delivery as well as fundamental principles of professional nursing practice. A link between NUR 304 (Patho/Pharm I) is facilitated to enhance application of those principles. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 350L, NUR 351 and NUR 352.

NUR 350L      FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND CARING FOR PERSONS WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS LAB      Credits: 4

This course introduces concepts of professional nursing practice. The course focuses on persons and families experiencing the impact of chronic illness and disease, including chronic mental health conditions. The course will integrate concepts of spiritual and cultural influences on care delivery as well as fundamental principles of professional nursing practice. A link between NUR 304 (Patho/Pharm I) is facilitated to enhance application of those principles. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 350, NUR 351 and NUR 352.

NUR 351      NURSING INTEGRATION OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY I      Credits: 4

This course explores processes underlying all disease states and systematically reviews pathophysiological changes in selected body systems with an emphasis on chronic illnesses. The course also provides an overview of pharmacology with systematic study of one representative drug in each class. Pathophysiology and pharmacology concepts are presented concurrently with a link to discussion of medical and nursing management of chronic illnesses in the clinical nursing course.
Corequisites: NUR 350 and NUR 352.

NUR 352      INTRODUCTION TO NURSING INFORMATICS AND INFORMATION LITERACY      Credits: 2

This course will provide nursing students with introductory knowledge and skills to use information management and patient care technologies to deliver safe and effective care. The course assists the nursing student to recognize when there is a need for information, and to be able to identify, locate, evaluate and effectively use that information for the issue or problem at hand. The course will provide information about library science and will explain how information literacy is used to locate appropriate resources for education of individual clients and the community about health and disease.
Corequisites: NUR 350 and NUR 351.

NUR 353      NURSING ROLE IN THE ACUTE CARE SETTING      Credits: 4

The course will examine the complexity of individuals in acute care settings. The course expands the concepts of professional nursing practice, care coordination, discharge planning, and nursing management of individuals experiencing an acute illness, injury or acute exacerbation of a chronic condition. Examination of mental health influences on acute, episodic events will be explored. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 353L, NUR 354 and NUR 355.

NUR 353L      NURSING ROLE IN THE ACUTE CARE SETTING LAB      Credits: 4

The course will examine the complexity of individuals in acute care settings. The course expands the concepts of professional nursing practice, care coordination, discharge planning, and nursing management of individuals experiencing an acute illness, injury or acute exacerbation of a chronic condition. Examination of mental health influences on acute, episodic events will be explored. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 353, NUR 354 and NUR 355.

NUR 354      NURSING INTEGRATION OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY II      Credits: 4

This course completes the examination of pathophysiological changes in the human body, with emphasis on acute illness and injury. The course examines pharmacology in greater depth with emphasis on clinical decision-making. Pathophysiology and pharmacology concepts are presented concurrently with discussion of medical and nursing management of acute illnesses in the clinical nursing course and with the mental health nursing theory course.
Corequisites: NUR 353 and NUR 355.

NUR 355      NURSING CARE OF CLIENTS WITH MENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH ISSUES      Credits: 3

This course examines mental health and strategies to enhance mental health of the individual and family within their social and cultural context. Skills in therapeutic communication and group dynamics will be developed. In addition, the course examines the most common psychiatric problems including their recognition, underlying biological and psychosocial dynamics, and effective interventions. Nursing care of mental health/addictive conditions of patients and families are explored from an evidenced-based perspective.
Prerequisites: NUR 350 and NUR 351 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 353 and NUR 354.

NUR 403      NURSING RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE      Credits: 2

This course enables the student to understand the purpose of nursing research, to identify common research designs, and to critique common research studies. The student will become familiar with the ways that notable nursing research has influenced quality practice. Likewise, this course examines the rationale for nursing practice to be grounded in research and other sources of evidence and explores evidence-based practice.
Prerequisites: NUR 352 with a C or higher.

NUR 410      NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN AND THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY      Credits: 4

In this course, the student studies both patient and family-centered care of childbearing families, mothers and newborns (obstetrical nursing) as well as patient and family-centered care of children (pediatric nursing). Evidence based practice in maternity, newborn and pediatric care is examined in the classroom, on-campus clinical (lab) that includes pediatric and obstetric assessment and nursing procedures, and in clinical practice in varied healthcare settings.
Corequisites: NUR 410L.

NUR 410L      NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN AND THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY LAB      Credits: 3

In this course, the student studies both patient and family-centered care of childbearing families, mothers and newborns (obstetrical nursing) as well as patient and family-centered care of children (pediatric nursing). Evidence based practice in maternity, newborn and pediatric care is examined in the classroom, on-campus clinical (lab) that includes pediatric and obstetric assessment and nursing procedures, and in clinical practice in varied healthcare settings.
Corequisites: NUR 410.

NUR 411      NURSING IN THE COMMUNITY      Credits: 4

This course focuses on community and population based care. Concepts related to health promotion and illness care are integrated with public health concepts to provide population centered health care in the community. Vulnerable populations will be served through individual and family focused care experiences in homes, clinics, shelters, health programs for the vulnerable, and other community-based settings. Populations with chronic illnesses and with mental health and behavioral issues will be included as well as well individuals.
Prerequisites: NUR 355 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 410L.

NUR 411L      NURSING IN THE COMMUNITY LAB      Credits: 3

This course focuses on community and population based care. Concepts related to health promotion and illness care are integrated with public health concepts to provide population centered health care in the community. Vulnerable populations will be served through individual and family focused care experiences in homes, clinics, shelters, health programs for the vulnerable, and other community-based settings. Populations with chronic illnesses and with mental health and behavioral issues will be included as well as well individuals.
Prerequisites: NUR 355 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 410.

NUR 412      NURSING LEADERSHIP AND HEALTH CARE POLICY      Credits: 3

This course examines nursing leadership and management within the context of health care delivery systems. Positive change, conflict management, delegation, supervision, team building, information systems, professional roles and ethical practice will be examined. The influence of health care policies on quality, culture of safety, and the health care environment in which nurses practice will be investigated.
Prerequisites: NUR 410 and NUR 411 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 413 and NUR 414.

NUR 413      COMPLEX CLINICAL NURSING CARE CAPSTONE      Credits: 3

This senior level capstone course will prepare students to transition into nursing practice. Students will build upon previous theoretical knowledge and clinical experiences to examine advanced concepts and develop advanced technical skills. Students will be immersed in the professional practice role during a 200-hour preceptored clinical experience.
Corequisites: NUR 413L, NUR 412 and NUR 414.

NUR 413L      COMPLEX CLINICAL NURSING CARE CAPSTONE LAB      Credits: 5

This senior level capstone course will prepare students to transition into nursing practice. Students will build upon previous theoretical knowledge and clinical experiences to examine advanced concepts and develop advanced technical skills. Students will be immersed in the professional practice role during a 200-hour preceptored clinical experience.
Corequisites: NUR 413, NUR 412 and NUR 414.

NUR 414      SPIRITUAL CARING AND ETHICS IN NURSING PRACTICE      Credits: 3

This course examines moral, ethical and legal aspects of delivering healthcare, and emphasizes development of an ethical framework for making decisions. Students will study models for ethical decision making, legal issues, and professional resources to guide the ethical practice of nursing.
Prerequisites: NUR 410 and NUR 411 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 412 and NUR 413.