Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program

Concordia’s nursing curriculum is completed in two full years. Currently, students begin in the summer before their junior year of college. The mission of the BSN Program: Concordia University's Nursing Program builds upon scientific preparation and liberal studies to develop clinical competence and reflective compassion. We strive to prepare nurses who practice evidenced-based care, promote health, and provide leadership within healthcare organizations and the community. 

The program was founded on the belief that nursing is a Christian calling. The practice of compassion is emphasized throughout the program, and cultural competence is systematically developed to prepare nurses committed to caring for diverse populations. The junior year emphasizes physiological nursing of adults experiencing physical illness. The program develops student competence and confidence in practice skills and deliberately intertwines pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical reasoning, and understanding of the human experience of illness to develop strong practice judgment. The senior year includes courses on mental health nursing, care of children and child bearing women. An intensive clinical preceptorship occurs in spring. Two courses in the curriculum focus on nursing in the community. Key curricular concepts include ethical reasoning and evidence based care.

Program Accreditation

The Concordia Nursing Program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and fully approved by the Oregon State Board of Nursing. Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Council Licensure Examinations (NCLEX-RN) which all nursing candidates in the United States must pass to become Registered Nurses.

Program Objectives

Graduates of Concordia University-Portland’s Nursing Program will:

  1. Use intrapersonal spiritual principles to guide personal and professional nursing responses when engaged in health care delivery that respects spiritual beliefs, cultural and individual differences, and the values of self and others.
  2. Collaborate with varied cultures, organizations, and communities promoting mutual projects for health promotion, policy development, and accessibility for the underserved.
  3. Communicate effectively by means of therapeutic and collaborative listening, recognizing the value, application, and ethical responsibilities when communicating through multiple technologies using professional language in diverse situations.
  4. Engage in leadership roles promoting safety and quality care in health care settings, illustrative of altruism, autonomy, human dignity, integrity, and social justice while working with organizational systems and regulatory environments.
  5. Use complex thinking to analyze holistic health needs of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations across the lifespan in various practice settings implementing evidence-based, patient-centered systems for optimizing health outcomes.

Admission

Admission to the BSN Freshman Program

For admission into the BSN Program as a freshman, follow the Undergraduate Admission Process in the Undergraduate Admission section. Currently, nursing admission requires the following:

  • Submit two letters of recommendation, preferably from science or math teachers who can attest to your qualifications as a strong candidate for Concordia’s nursing program.
  • Provide a word-processed essay on “Why I Want to Become a Nurse” (250-500 words)
  • Submit any of the following optional items: Additional letters of recommendation, documentation of volunteer experience in health care, academic honors if any, and extra-curricular involvement.

Lower Division BSN Benchmarks

Concordia University Freshmen who have been admitted to the BSN Freshman Program and who have successfully completed all benchmarks as described below DO NOT have to apply separately for acceptance into the upper division nursing program.

  • Maintain a 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average in all classes.
  • Maintain a 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average in math and science classes including College Algebra, Chemistry 101 & 102, Biology, Microbiology, and Anatomy and Physiology 364 & 365.
  • Complete an Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) approved (or equivalent) Basic Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training course before summer semester prior to the junior year.
  • Attend a Nursing Community Meeting each semester.
  • Demonstrate evidence of good citizenship and responsibility while on campus.

BSN students are notified in early spring of their sophomore year whether they meet the above criteria and can proceed into the BSN cohort. Grades for two semesters of chemistry, one semester of biology, and one semester of anatomy and physiology should be available at that time. Concordia students who have not met the BSN benchmarks but have maintained at least a 3.0 grade point average must submit an Admit to Major application, take a standardized nursing admissions examination, and submit responses to an application essay; currently the Insight Resume.

Transfer Policies

Transfer Requirements

BSN Application Portfolio

For admission to the upper division nursing major, all outside candidates and Concordia students who have not achieved the lower division BSN benchmarks, must submit a complete BSN Application Portfolio. All application portfolio materials must be submitted at one time in the portfolio envelope. Please note, applications will not be considered for admission if they are not complete upon receipt. The highly competitive review process will examine grades, and personal qualities identified in required essays and recommendations. BSN candidates can begin submitting applications for the upcoming summer BSN cohort on December 1 of the preceding year. BSN candidates must submit (or postmark) their completed BSN Application Portfolio by February 1 before the summer entrance.

A complete BSN Application Portfolio contains the following:

  1. Completed and signed BSN Application Checklist.
  2. Completed BSN Application Form with $250 non-refundable nursing application fee made payable to Concordia University.
  3. Required essays as described in the nursing application form.
  4. Two confidential letters of recommendation from a current professor, supervisor, or clergy that affirm ability to study at the university level and aptitude for nursing.
  5. Official transcripts from all institutions previously attended. Transcripts must remain in their sealed, unopened envelopes to be considered official. (Concordia students must submit only transcripts from other institutions attended since they began attending at CU.)
  6. Evidence of completing a Nursing Assistant in a CNA program approved by the Oregon State Board of Nursing (or equivalent).
  7. Documentation of completed general education and prerequisite courses.

General Transfer Policies

Biology Prerequisites

Students who have completed course equivalents for all three higher level nursing prerequisite biology courses (BIO 284, BIO 364, and BIO 365), may fulfill BIO 211 with any 100 level or higher human biology course with a lab; the course must be/have been taken for a letter grade.

Latency Policy

Transfer credits will be accept which meet the following criteria:

  • Math coursework - 10 year or younger
  • Science coursework - 7 years or younger

Note:  Latency is counted from the year the student starts at CU (not the cohort start), and goes back to the year the coursework was completed.

Curricular Requirements

Nursing students will complete most general education courses by the end of their sophomore year. Currently, the summer before the junior year, students register for nursing major courses.

Donna Bachand, Ph.D., Professor, dbachand@cu-portland.edu

Dawn Bock, M.S.N., dbock@cu-portland.edu

Mitchell W. Donald, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, dmitchell@cu-portland.edu

HollyAnne Heaton, M.A.T., Assistant Professor, hheaton@cu-portland.edu

Lisa J. Mariea Presnall, ND/D.N.P., Professor, lpresnall@cu-portland.edu

Joyce Zerwekh, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus

NUR 301      THE NURSING EXPERIENCE      Credits: 6

This introductory course prepares the student to provide basic nursing care. The course parallels education to receive certification as a nursing assistant and includes classroom study of the human experience of being a patient, helping interpersonal skills, and selected basic nursing concepts. Cultural sensitivity will be introduced.

NUR 303      CLINICAL NURSING I: CARE OF THE ADULT WITH PHYSICAL ILLNESS      Credits: 7

The student in this course will study fundamental nursing concepts and develop proficiency in beginning therapeutic nursing interventions. The course will foster understanding of chronic illness, care of the aging, rehabilitation, long term care, and end-of-life nursing. Physiological nursing assessment and intervention for patients with selected conditions will be introduced. Theory is presented concurrent with skills laboratory (introductory assessment skills and nursing procedures) and clinical experience in long term care.

NUR 304      INTEGRATION OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY I      Credits: 3

This course explores processes common to all pathologies, and then systematically reviews pathophysiological changes in selected body systems. The course also provides an overview of pharmacology with systematic study of one representative drug in each drug category. Underlying disease processes and pharmacology are presented concurrent with discussion of nursing process in Clinical Nursing I.

NUR 305      HEALTH PROMOTION      Credits: 3

This course begins with an examination of ways the nursing student can sustain and enhance his/her own physical, emotional, and spiritual health throughout the nursing curriculum. Evidence based information on health promoting activities will be examined. Holistic health measures will be discussed in this context. Essential health promotion activities throughout the lifespan will be explored, as well as current knowledge about effective health education and the challenges of behavior change. This course will include the opportunity to teach and develop health promoting relationships in various settings that may include schools, day care centers, senior centers and living facilities, community centers, and campus. Cross cultural competence will be stressed.

NUR 313      CLINICAL NURSING II: CARE OF THE HOSPITALIZED ADULT WITH ACUTE PHYSICAL ILLNESS      Credits: 7

This course continues the study of physiological nursing assessment and intervention initiated in Clinical Nursing I. Special emphasis is given to expanding the student's understanding of the nursing process and clinical reasoning using case narratives that include stories of human illness experiences as well as clinical data. Theory is presented concurrent with skills laboratory (intermediate assessment skills and more complex nursing procedures) and clinical practice in the hospital setting.

NUR 314      INTEGRATION OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY II      Credits: 3

This course completes the examination of pathophysiological changes in the human body and examines pharmacology in greater depth with emphasis on clinical decision making. Underlying disease processes and pharmacological therapies are presented concurrent with relevant discussion of nursing process in Clinical Nursing II. Efficacy of herbal and other complementary remedies will be examined in this course.

NUR 341      PSYCHOSOCIAL AND SPIRITUAL CARING      Credits: 3

This course focuses on spiritual self-awareness, sensitive spiritual assessment, and caring spiritual interventions. Also introduced are selected concepts that focus on family assessment and intervention, as well as cross cultural assessment and culturally competent practice. This will be an interdisciplinary course taught with both nursing and social work students.
Prerequisites: REL 371 with a D or higher.

NUR 350      FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND CARING FOR PERSONS WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS      Credits: 4

This course introduces concepts of professional nursing practice. The course focuses on persons and families experiencing the impact of chronic illness and disease, including chronic mental health conditions. The course will integrate concepts of spiritual and cultural influences on care delivery as well as fundamental principles of professional nursing practice. A link between NUR 304 (Patho/Pharm I) is facilitated to enhance application of those principles. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 350L, NUR 351 and NUR 352.

NUR 350L      FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING AND CARING FOR PERSONS WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS LAB      Credits: 4

This course introduces concepts of professional nursing practice. The course focuses on persons and families experiencing the impact of chronic illness and disease, including chronic mental health conditions. The course will integrate concepts of spiritual and cultural influences on care delivery as well as fundamental principles of professional nursing practice. A link between NUR 304 (Patho/Pharm I) is facilitated to enhance application of those principles. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 350, NUR 351 and NUR 352.

NUR 351      NURSING INTEGRATION OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY I      Credits: 4

This course explores processes underlying all disease states and systematically reviews pathophysiological changes in selected body systems with an emphasis on chronic illnesses. The course also provides an overview of pharmacology with systematic study of one representative drug in each class. Pathophysiology and pharmacology concepts are presented concurrently with a link to discussion of medical and nursing management of chronic illnesses in the clinical nursing course.
Corequisites: NUR 350 and NUR 352.

NUR 352      INTRODUCTION TO NURSING INFORMATICS AND INFORMATION LITERACY      Credits: 2

This course will provide nursing students with introductory knowledge and skills to use information management and patient care technologies to deliver safe and effective care. The course assists the nursing student to recognize when there is a need for information, and to be able to identify, locate, evaluate and effectively use that information for the issue or problem at hand. The course will provide information about library science and will explain how information literacy is used to locate appropriate resources for education of individual clients and the community about health and disease.
Corequisites: NUR 350 and NUR 351.

NUR 353      NURSING ROLE IN THE ACUTE CARE SETTING      Credits: 4

The course will examine the complexity of individuals in acute care settings. The course expands the concepts of professional nursing practice, care coordination, discharge planning, and nursing management of individuals experiencing an acute illness, injury or acute exacerbation of a chronic condition. Examination of mental health influences on acute, episodic events will be explored. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 353L, NUR 354 and NUR 355.

NUR 353L      NURSING ROLE IN THE ACUTE CARE SETTING LAB      Credits: 4

The course will examine the complexity of individuals in acute care settings. The course expands the concepts of professional nursing practice, care coordination, discharge planning, and nursing management of individuals experiencing an acute illness, injury or acute exacerbation of a chronic condition. Examination of mental health influences on acute, episodic events will be explored. The course has a clinical component.
Corequisites: NUR 353, NUR 354 and NUR 355.

NUR 354      NURSING INTEGRATION OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY II      Credits: 4

This course completes the examination of pathophysiological changes in the human body, with emphasis on acute illness and injury. The course examines pharmacology in greater depth with emphasis on clinical decision-making. Pathophysiology and pharmacology concepts are presented concurrently with discussion of medical and nursing management of acute illnesses in the clinical nursing course and with the mental health nursing theory course.
Corequisites: NUR 353 and NUR 355.

NUR 355      NURSING CARE OF CLIENTS WITH MENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH ISSUES      Credits: 3

This course examines mental health and strategies to enhance mental health of the individual and family within their social and cultural context. Skills in therapeutic communication and group dynamics will be developed. In addition, the course examines the most common psychiatric problems including their recognition, underlying biological and psychosocial dynamics, and effective interventions. Nursing care of mental health/addictive conditions of patients and families are explored from an evidenced-based perspective.
Prerequisites: NUR 350 and NUR 351 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 353 and NUR 354.

NUR 401      CLINICAL NURSING III: CARE OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH MENTAL HEALTH CHALLENGES      Credits: 4

This course examines mental health and strategies to enhance mental health of the healthy individual and family within their social and cultural context. Cross cultural understandings of mental health and illness will be examined. Skills in therapeutic communication and group dynamics will be developed. In addition, the course examines the most common psychiatric problems including their recognition, underlying biological and psychosocial dynamics, and effective interventions. The course includes clinical placements in outpatient and hospital settings.

NUR 402      CLINICAL NURSING IV: CARE OF CHILDREN AND CARE OF THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY      Credits: 8

In this course, the student studies both the family-centered care of children (pediatric nursing) and care of childbearing mothers and newborns (obstetrical nursing). Special emphasis is given to expanding the student's understanding of the nursing process and clinical reasoning using case narratives that include stories of human illness experiences as well as clinical data. The student will develop sensitivity to the needs of families from diverse cultures. Theory is presented concurrent with skills laboratory (pediatric and obstetric assessment and nursing procedures) and clinical practice in hospital and outpatient settings.

NUR 403      NURSING RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE      Credits: 2

This course enables the student to understand the purpose of nursing research, to identify common research designs, and to critique common research studies. The student will become familiar with the ways that notable nursing research has influenced quality practice. Likewise, this course examines the rationale for nursing practice to be grounded in research and other sources of evidence and explores evidence-based practice.
Prerequisites: NUR 352 with a C or higher.

NUR 404      LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT      Credits: 2

This course examines nursing leadership and management within contemporary health care services. Positive change, conflict management, delegation, supervision, and team building are emphasized. Professional responsibility and ethical practice are strongly emphasized.

NUR 405      CLINICAL NURSING V: SENIOR INTEGRATION: COMPLEX CARE AND STUDENT PRECEPTORSHIP      Credits: 8

This culminating senior level course serves several purposes. Students will examine essential concepts and skills of nursing the critically ill and apply this to clinical placements where patients are receiving intensive care for highly unstable conditions. Care of the chronically ill, aging, and dying will be examined at the senior level. Students will have a half semester opportunity to practice in a clinical practicum site of their choice. This course will also incorporate an intensive NCLEX review to pass the licensing examination. In addition, this class will require laboratory hours to strengthen nursing assessment and intervention skills in preparation for professional practice.

NUR 406      CLINICAL NURSING IV: COMMUNITY NURSING      Credits: 4

The senior level course integrates student learning about health and illness to provide care that focuses on health promotion for entire communities and populations, as well as to provide individual and family focused care through practice in homes, clinics, shelters, and other community-based settings. The student will deepen ability to provide culturally competent care.

NUR 410      NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN AND THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY      Credits: 4

In this course, the student studies both patient and family-centered care of childbearing families, mothers and newborns (obstetrical nursing) as well as patient and family-centered care of children (pediatric nursing). Evidence based practice in maternity, newborn and pediatric care is examined in the classroom, on-campus clinical (lab) that includes pediatric and obstetric assessment and nursing procedures, and in clinical practice in varied healthcare settings.
Corequisites: NUR 410L.

NUR 410L      NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN AND THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY LAB      Credits: 3

In this course, the student studies both patient and family-centered care of childbearing families, mothers and newborns (obstetrical nursing) as well as patient and family-centered care of children (pediatric nursing). Evidence based practice in maternity, newborn and pediatric care is examined in the classroom, on-campus clinical (lab) that includes pediatric and obstetric assessment and nursing procedures, and in clinical practice in varied healthcare settings.
Corequisites: NUR 410.

NUR 411      NURSING IN THE COMMUNITY      Credits: 4

This course focuses on community and population based care. Concepts related to health promotion and illness care are integrated with public health concepts to provide population centered health care in the community. Vulnerable populations will be served through individual and family focused care experiences in homes, clinics, shelters, health programs for the vulnerable, and other community-based settings. Populations with chronic illnesses and with mental health and behavioral issues will be included as well as well individuals.
Prerequisites: NUR 355 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 410L.

NUR 411L      NURSING IN THE COMMUNITY LAB      Credits: 3

This course focuses on community and population based care. Concepts related to health promotion and illness care are integrated with public health concepts to provide population centered health care in the community. Vulnerable populations will be served through individual and family focused care experiences in homes, clinics, shelters, health programs for the vulnerable, and other community-based settings. Populations with chronic illnesses and with mental health and behavioral issues will be included as well as well individuals.
Prerequisites: NUR 355 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 410.

NUR 412      NURSING LEADERSHIP AND HEALTH CARE POLICY      Credits: 3

This course examines nursing leadership and management within the context of health care delivery systems. Positive change, conflict management, delegation, supervision, team building, information systems, professional roles and ethical practice will be examined. The influence of health care policies on quality, culture of safety, and the health care environment in which nurses practice will be investigated.
Prerequisites: NUR 410 and NUR 411 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 413 and NUR 414.

NUR 413      COMPLEX CLINICAL NURSING CARE CAPSTONE      Credits: 3

This senior level capstone course will prepare students to transition into nursing practice. Students will build upon previous theoretical knowledge and clinical experiences to examine advanced concepts and develop advanced technical skills. Students will be immersed in the professional practice role during a 200-hour preceptored clinical experience.
Corequisites: NUR 413L, NUR 412 and NUR 414.

NUR 413L      COMPLEX CLINICAL NURSING CARE CAPSTONE LAB      Credits: 5

This senior level capstone course will prepare students to transition into nursing practice. Students will build upon previous theoretical knowledge and clinical experiences to examine advanced concepts and develop advanced technical skills. Students will be immersed in the professional practice role during a 200-hour preceptored clinical experience.
Corequisites: NUR 413, NUR 412 and NUR 414.

NUR 414      SPIRITUAL CARING AND ETHICS IN NURSING PRACTICE      Credits: 3

This course examines moral, ethical and legal aspects of delivering healthcare, and emphasizes development of an ethical framework for making decisions. Students will study models for ethical decision making, legal issues, and professional resources to guide the ethical practice of nursing.
Prerequisites: NUR 410 and NUR 411 with a C or higher
Corequisites: NUR 412 and NUR 413.