Homeland Security & Emergency Management (B.S.)

Introduction

This degree focuses on domestic and international security issues and the rudiments of management. Studies include:

  • infrastructure protection 
  • preparation for natural and man-made disasters
  • local and regional crisis response
  • strategic planning for security
  • international relations
  • the ethics of leadership
  • legal and moral issues and responsibilities of the security leader
  • international and domestic terrorism
  • intelligence operations and evaluation
  • program management.

Graduates are provided a grounding in general education offerings, development of a more global outlook, attention to interpersonal skills and relation-building in small classes, and a keen awareness of current issues in national security. In sum, graduates will receive an educational foundation that will help them become “leaders for the transformation of society.”

Through a combination of education, training and experience, candidates will gain the specific knowledge and skills that will enable them to think, analyze, and process as security and emergency responder specialists. Throughout their careers, candidates will face new threats and risks that do not yet exist. This program will provide skills and practice in how to adapt to emerging situations and leverage one’s education to create new and effective prevention strategies and crisis responses.

Mission

The Concordia University Homeland Security & Emergency Management program graduates leaders to ensure the safety and resiliency of communities throughout our state, the nation, and the world.

Program Goals and Objectives

Program Goals

  • Provide service-oriented professionals with the requisite knowledge, skills, personal ethics and attitudes to provide the leadership necessary to ensure the safety of America’s citizens
  • Prepare a unique team of community and state leaders who, trusting in the importance of a faith-based foundation, protect the rights of our citizens, insure progress is made with guidance from a moral and ethical foundation, and secure the safety of our citizens within the framework of the law
  • Provide critical, trained leadership that can successfully lead communities through an emerging crisis and help them prevent, prepare, respond and recover
  • Develop cooperative skills among all community stakeholders to capitalize on the synergy created by partnerships and collaboration
  • Provide specific knowledge and skills that enable candidates to mentally process and analyze manmade and natural threats so communities can anticipate, prevent, and counter such threats
  • Teach the necessary skills required to properly obtain and process information regarding risk to communities, the citizens of our land, and critical state and national resources
  • Provide the requisite skills necessary to properly obtain critical information required by decision makers, as well as the ability to analyze this same information for additional meaning and relevance

Laurie J. Holien, M.A., Assistant Professor, lholien@cu-portland.edu

Jason P. Nairn, M.A., Assistant Professor, jnairn@cu-portland.edu

HSEM 301      INTRODUCTION TO HOMELAND SECURITY      Credits: 3

This course provides an initial exposure to national security studies and is designed to provide a basic understanding of this topic to those pursuing a major as well as those with an interest in this field of study. Students will explore the definition of homeland security, identify the stakeholders and current issues, explore its relevance in today’s society, and explore what may be emerging under the national security umbrella. Homeland Security has become part of the American lexicon, and students in this class will give the discipline an academic scrutiny.

HSEM 310      INTEREST INTEGRATION      Credits: 3

One of the most important skills for the future emergency preparedness or national security practitioner is the ability to facilitate the successful integration of stakeholders from disparate groups. As with any complex issue, emergency management and homeland security have a wide variety of interested parties, and their respective agendas may be at odds. This course will explore various interest groups and their agendas, and provide the student with practical methods to coalesce these groups for the benefit of local, regional and national security.

HSEM 315      RISK ASSESSMENT, ANALYSIS, AND IMPACT      Credits: 3

This course gives the student an opportunity to study how risk is determined, and what value this information has for the homeland security practitioner. Students will explore how assessments are conducted, and how data is processed into a picture useful to the preparation, prevention and response to a disaster. Once a risk picture exists, security leaders can decide what to protect, and the impact of the loss of a particular asset. This process is a key element of Critical Infrastructure Protection.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 with a C or higher.

HSEM 330      THE PSYCHOLOGY OF TERRORISM      Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the study of the psychology of terrorism, and reviews those conditions that foster terrorism and suicide bombers as well as the psychological impact of terrorism on our local, national, and international communities. Candidates will study the social aspects of terrorism, and how its use fits into the political spectrum of existing and emerging countries. Radical terrorist groups will be investigated from a cultural, religious and philosophical perspective.

HSEM 332      SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ROOTS OF TERRORISM      Credits: 3

This course includes the study of terrorism as the impetus for the development of Homeland Security as a discipline and industry. It will define and address those conditions that foster domestic terrorism, as well as study the psychological impact of terrorism on our nation’s communities. Further, it will address the social aspects of terrorism, and how terrorism works into the political spectrum and can thus impact domestic policy. A number of domestic terrorist groups will be investigated including left wing and right wing groups, as well as single purpose entities such as environmental or radical antiabortion groups. Students will consider counter-radicalization, the media campaign, counter-terrorism, and the exploration of the human terrain initiative.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 with a C or higher.

HSEM 335      CYBER SECURITY      Credits: 3

This course will study security in the virtual world. Course work will study the threat, as well as policy issues that thrust cyber activity into the criminal realm, or the realm of international conflict and the rules of war. Threat analysis will include some types of threat, theft of intellectual property, and infrastructure disruption.

HSEM 360      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND MANAGEMENT      Credits: 3

This course explores the roles, duties and responsibilities of Emergency Management (EM) on the local, state, federal and private levels as well as the duties and responsibilities of each. The course will also explore how EM differs from other security functions through its involvement with crisis management: decisions made with limited data, new or non-customary relationships, changing scale of responsibilities, and an evolving role of private industry and citizens. Students will also gain an exposure to the Incident Command System.

HSEM 365      VOLUNTEERS, DONATIONS AND HUMANITARIAN AID      Credits: 3

This course explores the complexities of coordinating the unmet needs and immense anxiety of disaster survivors, with the structure and rigor of government public safety agencies and the capabilities of both organized and unaffiliated volunteers. Students will study the structure and goals of Volunteer Organizations Active during Disasters (VOADs) and spontaneous digital technology communities, active across the world. This course also examines the interface between international humanitarian aid efforts and federal coordinating agencies.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 390      TECHNOLOGY FOR HOMELAND SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT      Credits: 3

Government agencies in today’s fast-paced Information Age are more dependent than ever on technology to ensure a common operating picture and effective information sharing among partners. This course provides students a broad overview of homeland security technologies, information systems, surveillance technology, communications systems, and emerging and disruptive technologies. Students will examine the maturity of technologies along the adoption spectrum and develop and apply requirements for influencing future capabilities. This course focuses on technology as a tool to support homeland security and emergency management personnel regardless of functional specialty.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 395      SPECIAL TOPICS IN HOMELAND SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT      Credits: 3

Topics will be announced by program director.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 with a C or higher.

HSEM 401      MORAL DECISION MAKING, POLICIES, AND CIVIL RIGHTS      Credits: 3

This course examines the cross-sections of ideologies that influence morals, government roles and policies to keep order, and the civil rights of Americans. The American population fosters an array of opinions and attitudes about homeland security, government laws designed to protect lives, the policies and statutes of government agencies, and the conflicts that can arise impacting civil rights and liberties. Students in this course will analyze and engage in discourse to explore and gain an understanding of the overlap and dichotomies between the policy decisions of government officials and civilian values and morals.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 406      CHARACTER AND THE ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP      Credits: 3

Candidates will explore contemporary models of security leadership, synthesize a personal statement of vocation informed by their leadership values and assumptions, and test their synthesis against a variety of assignments and practical experiences. The course also provides a forum where candidates enjoy the opportunity to identify and consider their own character, personal values, and workplace ethics. Each will develop an understanding of the importance of ethical leadership in one’s professional, personal and family life, and will appreciate the personal fulfillment that flows from living and modeling such values and, perhaps most importantly, of serving others.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 415      STRATEGIC PLANNING AND BUDGETING      Credits: 3

All national security efforts should flow from the National Strategy for Homeland Security since it is this document which drives all subsequent levels to include state, local and business strategies for local and national security. This course explores national strategy development, the existing strategies for homeland security, and provides students with a detailed overview of how these strategies flow into resourcing and budgeting.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 440      CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION      Credits: 3

Protecting our nation’s critical infrastructure requires a multilayered security and emergency management approach. Students in this course will explore security threats to infrastructure ranging from low-level offenses such as vandalism and theft, to acts of sabotage, denial of service, and terrorism. Critical infrastructure systems are also vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters. As a result, the ability to respond and quickly restore interruptions in service is constantly tested through emergencies and natural disasters such as flooding, wind and ice storms, earthquakes and hurricanes. This course examines the need to manage aging infrastructure, strengthen resiliency, and protect against intentional attacks.
Prerequisites: HSEM 315 with a C or higher.

HSEM 450      RELIGION IN THE MODERN WORLD      Credits: 3

The course will orient students to the pervasive nature of religion in all aspects of the modern world with special attention to how social interaction with religious people occurs in contemporary society and influences politics and conflict.
Prerequisites: HSEM 332 with a C or higher.

HSEM 454      THE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY      Credits: 3

Quality Intelligence provides the homeland security leader on any level with timely analysis of relevant information. The challenge with this intelligence is to guarantee it is collected and utilized within legal guidelines and still provide appropriate assistance from the best sources possible. This course introduces the student to the intelligence community, the intelligence process, the legal and ethical conduct expected and required in gathering intelligence, and intelligence analysis. Students will better understand integration of sources, and how intelligence can be used to optimize the homeland security effort.
Prerequisites: HSEM 332 with a C or higher.

HSEM 464      BUILDING RESILIENT COMMUNITIES      Credits: 3

Resilient communities are those that have taken appropriate actions to minimize the impact of a catastrophic occurrence. Historical examples show that life is never the same after a disaster, but communities that survive and thrive are those that have resiliency. This course will step students through the emergency management planning cycle (prevent, prepare, respond, recover) to illustrate how to foster community resiliency.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 470      MANAGING DISASTERS      Credits: 3

This course examines the complex and fast-moving environment surrounding disaster management. While emergency preparedness, resilience, and mitigation efforts can lessen the impacts of disasters, we cannot eliminate all threats. This course examines the competing priorities, the structures required by the federal government, and the roles and responsibilities of the many different players with a role during the response phase. Students will explore different scale disasters through exercises that will test and overwhelm local and regional capabilities. Local students will use Concordia’s Homeland Security Simulation Lab to engage with peers and learn how disasters escalate with cascading consequences. Students will gain knowledge about federal disaster declarations and systems used to coordinate logistics and support of out-of-area resources.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 494      PRACTICUM      Credits: 6

The practicum is the culmination of the learning process where theory is put into practice. For the security studies major, there are two options for this final effort. First, students can elect to research a specific element of foreign or domestic terrorism. This would require an in depth study of a particular group, with a final product of a mitigation or co-opting strategy. The alternative is an emergency management project that would include the creation of a detailed emergency preparation or response action plan. The plan would be based on a risk analysis that includes critical infrastructure protection, threat prioritization, and intelligence analysis.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher.

HSEM 498      HOMELAND SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP I      Credits: 1-6

This course enables Homeland Security and Emergency Management students to explore different career paths while they are engaged in this field of study. Students who locate an organization offering an internship related to homeland security and emergency management, will apply their acquired knowledge to real world organizations’ goals, objectives and missions. Students will refine their skillsets and build their portfolios with examples of their work, helping to prepare them during future job search activities.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher; Program Director approval.

HSEM 499      HSEM INTERNSHIP II      Credits: 1-6

This course enables Homeland Security and Emergency Management students to explore different career paths while they are engaged in this field of study. Students who locate an organization offering an internship related to homeland security and emergency management, will apply their acquired knowledge to real world organizations’ goals, objectives and missions. Students will refine their skillsets and build their portfolios with examples of their work, helping to prepare them during future job search activities.
Prerequisites: HSEM 301 and HSEM 360 with a C or higher; Program Director approval.