Psychology

The Psychology major offers students an opportunity to explore the forces that shape human behavior and thought. In addition to completing the psychology core requirements, students take upper level courses in one of four concentrations and complete either an internship or senior thesis. This degree program provides outstanding preparation for working in a mental health profession; advocating for children, youth and families; or matriculating into graduate school programs designed to produce counselors, psychologists, or psychiatrists. A student may begin the Admission to the Psychology Major process upon completion of 45 semester credits (at least 30 of which are General Education requirements) with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50, completion of one course in the psychology major at CU, and demonstration of competency in the principles of psychology.

The Psychology Department offers PSY 381 INTERNATIONAL SERVICE IN PSYCHOLOGY. This course is a faulty-led, short-term study abroad program, including volunteer placement and cultural experiences. Priority is given to Psychology majors and minors, however, other majors can register with Department Chair approval. For more information on the trip this year please visit:  http://www.cu-portland.edu/sites/default/files/pdf/concordia-cape-town-2018.pdf 

R. Bryant Carlson, M.S., Associate Professor, bcarlson@cu-portland.edu

Frederick D. Kramer, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

Erin A. Mueller, Ph.D., Professor, emueller@cu-portland.edu

Reed M. Mueller, Ph.D., Professor, rmueller@cu-portland.edu

Jane Graves Smith, Ed.D., Professor, jsmith@cu-portland.edu

PSY 201      PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

This course reviews the scientific study of human behavior, its principles, and terminology, including the study of the mental growth of individuals, learning theory, personality, motivation, and individual differences.

PSY 201H      PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY-HONOR      Credits: 3

This course reviews the scientific study of human behavior, its principles, and terminology including the study of the mental growth of individuals, learning theory, personality, motivation, and individual differences.

PSY 231      RESEARCH AND STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES      Credits: 3

An overview of research and statistical techniques: experimental design, sampling, data gathering, central tendency, differences between groups, analysis of variance, chi-square and proportions, non-parametric test, regression, correlation, special applications to problems in the natural and social sciences and business.
Prerequisites: MTH 110 or MTH 123 with a D or higher.

PSY 231H      RESEARCH & STATS TECH - HONORS      Credits: 3

An overview of research and statistical techniques: experimental design, sampling, data gathering, central tendency, differences between groups, analysis of variance, chi-square and proportions, non-parametric test, regression, correlation, special applications to problems in the natural and social sciences and business.
Prerequisites: MTH 110 or MTH 123 with a D or higher.

PSY 251      SEMINAR      Credit: 1

A reading and discussion course that has topics of general interest to both psychology majors and general audiences. Upper division credit will require greater participation. An opportunity to explore new ideas and current research with faculty and other students.

PSY 288      DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR      Credit: 1

A reading and discussion course that has topics of general interest to both psychology majors and general audiences. Upper division credit will require greater participation. An opportunity to explore new ideas and current research with faculty and other students.

PSY 289      UNDERSTANDING THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR      Credit: 1

This course presents the student with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the psychology major. This will be accomplished through focused study of the following professional areas: choosing the major in psychology, research methods including the use of library search tools, career development issues in psychology, critical thinking skill-development, and introduction to the research and clinical practice traditions that weave throughout the formal study of psychology at the university level. Students will have the opportunity to use the social sciences to better understand themselves and others. Emphasis will also be given to developing students’ familiarity with APA writing style and accessing the scientific literature in psychology. Required for students choosing psychology as a major and anticipating a career and/or advanced studies in the field.
Prerequisites: Psychology majors only.

PSY 299E      EXPERIMENTAL COURSE - PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 2

Experimental course option varies by term. Please see academic department for course description.

PSY 312      HUMAN SEXUALITY      Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to human sexuality, including the psychological and physiological aspects of sexuality. Students will study human sexuality from a developmental and relational point of view.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 321      HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT      Credits: 3

An investigation of human development from conception throughout the lifespan. Special emphasis upon determinants of development, review of theoretical viewpoints, stages of development, growth and functioning of intelligence, and special developmental problems.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher (No prerequisite needed for the ABSN program).

PSY 331H      RESEARCH AND STATS - HONORS      Credits: 3

PSY 332      RESEARCH METHODS WITH LAB      Credits: 4

A critical examination of the principles of research design and research methods in the field of psychology. Students will have the opportunity to design and conduct their own experiments. A lab meeting provides each student with the opportunity to learn and practice quantitative analysis and other relevant skills.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 and PSY 231 with a C or higher.

PSY 343      THEORIES OF PERSONALITY      Credits: 3

This course will foster an understanding of historic and contemporary theories of personality. Also explored will be the comparison of personality theories using a philosophical framework.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 345      CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT      Credits: 3

An investigation into human development during childhood and adolescence. This course will emphasize the physical, mental, and emotional growth during this age period and special attention will be paid to growth and cultural factors that impact child and adolescent development.
Prerequisites: PSY 321 with a C or higher.

PSY 350      COUNSELING THEORY      Credits: 3

A survey of counseling and interviewing procedures as well as the study of recent contributions of psychological theory to counseling techniques.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 351      ADULT DEVELOPMENT      Credits: 3

This course exposes students to theories and research related to the developmental process in early, middle, and late adulthood.
Prerequisites: PSY 321 with a C or higher.

PSY 360      FAMILY DEVELOPMENT      Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the family as a developing system. Each stage of the complex family lifecycle will be explored. Throughout this exploration information on and appreciation of diversity of family forms will be given attention. Students will also explore healthy parenting practices and the research foundation for those practices.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 362      SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

Social psychology is defined as the scientific study of how individuals think, feel, and behave in social situations. This course is an examination of the foundations of personality and the interplay of culture and personality, as well as the behavior of groups.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 364      INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

Provides introduction to major concepts and practices associated with clinical psychology, which is the branch of psychology specializing in psychological assessment and treatment. Students learn behavioral, cognitive, intellectual, and personality assessment techniques, consider current issues in the field, and explore various clinical psychology subspecialties (e.g., health/medical, community, neuro, and forensic).
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher and MTH 231 or BA 247 with a C or higher.

PSY 370      INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

Community psychology works to strengthen the abilities of communities, settings, organizations, and broader social systems to meet people’s needs. It blends research and practice, working with diverse citizens to plan and implement community changes, advance social justice, and use research to inform and evaluate this work. The focus is on helping people access resources and collaborate with others to improve their lives and communities. Instead of helping individuals cope with negative circumstances (e.g., trauma, poverty), community psychology empowers people to change those circumstances, prevent problems, and develop stronger communities.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 380      GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

An examination of global perspectives on the history of psychology and current psychological practices across the globe.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 381      INTERNATIONAL SERVICE IN PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 1-3

This course will provide students with an opportunity to increase their global awareness. This will be accomplished through a faculty-led, short term study abroad program, including a volunteer placement and associated cultural experiences.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher, PSY 380 recommended, Department Chair approval.

PSY 391      PRE-INTERNSHIP SEMINAR      Credit: 1

This course is required for students planning to complete a psychology practicum. Students will obtain a site for the practicum during fall semester, which will then be completed in spring semester.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher. Student must have completed one semester in residence at Concordia University.

PSY 399E      EXPERIMENTAL COURSE - PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 2

Experimental course option varies by term. Please see academic department for course description.

PSY 410      HELPING SKILLS      Credits: 3

Communication theory is explored and skills are presented and experienced through class involvement. These will include skills necessary for interpersonal relationships with individuals and groups.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 412      NEUROLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

This course will study the brain and its functions as they relate to human behavior. Particular attention will be placed on brain abnormalities that can lead to mental illness.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 420      HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

Students will have an opportunity to study the great thinkers in the field of psychology and its historical traditions. The course will provide a complete perspective as a foundation to an understanding of current psychological research.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 422      PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY      Credits: 3

This course will focus on the psychological factors related to participation and adherence in sport and physical activity. Students will explore how social and psychological variables influence participation and performance in sport and physical activity and how participation in sport and physical activity affect the psychological well-being of the individual.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 434      ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

A survey and evaluation of disorders of personality, thought, and behavior. Includes a review of diagnostic techniques, preventive programs, biological and psychological therapies, and other strategies of intervention.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 442      BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR      Credits: 3

This course will study the brain and its function as they relate to human behavior. Particular attention will be placed on brain abnormalities that can lead to mental illness.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 with a C or higher.

PSY 451      SEMINAR      Credit: 1

A reading and discussion course that has topics of general interest to both psychology majors and general audiences. Upper division credit will require greater participation. An opportunity to explore new ideas and current research with faculty and other students.

PSY 488      DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR      Credit: 1

A reading and discussion course that has topics of general interest to both psychology majors and general audiences. Upper division credit will require greater participation. An opportunity to explore new ideas and current research with faculty and other students.

PSY 489      UNDERSTANDING THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR      Credit: 1

This course presents the student with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the psychology major. This will be accomplished through focused study of the following professional areas: choosing the major in psychology, research methods including the use of library search tools, career development issues in psychology, critical thinking skill-development, and introduction to the research and clinical practice traditions that weave throughout the formal study of psychology at the university level. Students will have the opportunity to use the social sciences to better understand themselves and others. Emphasis will also be given to developing students’ familiarity with APA writing style and accessing the scientific literature in psychology. Required for students choosing psychology as a major and anticipating a career and/or advanced studies in the field.
Prerequisites: Psychology majors only.

PSY 491      PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP      Credits: 5

This course provides a supervised field placement along with a psychology seminar. The intent of this course is to give the psychology major significant experience towards applying classroom learning.
Prerequisites: PSY 391 with a C or higher and Instructor approval.

PSY 492      SENIOR THESIS PREPARATION      Credit: 1

This course is required for students planning to complete a senior thesis. The product of this course will be a thesis proposal.
Prerequisites: PSY 332 with a B or higher.

PSY 493      PSYCHOLOGY THESIS I: LITERATURE REVIEW AND PROJECT DESIGN      Credits: 2

The first of two courses required to complete the thesis option of the Senior Project for graduation from any major in the College of Arts & Sciences. Thesis students are guided through the initial components of the thesis, including literature review and experimental or project design, obtain approval from Concordia's Institutional Review Board (IRB) to proceed with the proposed research or project, and begin to implement the research or project.
Prerequisites: PSY 492 with a B or higher, upper division standing, and agreement of a faculty member to serve as Faculty Supervisor for thesis project.

PSY 494      PSYCHOLOGY THESIS II: RESEARCH, WRITING, AND DEFENSE      Credits: 2

The second of two courses required to complete the thesis option of the Senior Project for graduation from any major in the College of Arts & Sciences. Thesis students are guided through the final components of the thesis, including the research or project itself, data gathering and analysis, and writing and defense of the thesis. The defense of the thesis will be a public event open to faculty, staff, students, and community members.
Prerequisites: PSY 493 with a C or higher.

PSY 496      PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM      Credits: 3

A departmental specific course.
Prerequisites: PSY 201 and PSY 231 with a C or higher and Department Chair approval.

PSY 499      INDEPENDENT STUDY      Credits: 1-3

PSY 519      SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS      Credits: 3

This course is designed to deepen students understanding of the methods with which social scientists work to systematically understand social phenomena, including identifying general patterns and relationships, testing and refining theory, and making predictions.

PSY 520      STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS      Credits: 3

An extension of PSY 519, this course will be the second course in an applied statistics sequence. Students in this course will obtain a foundational understanding of the various theories underlying probability, statistics, and quantitative data analysis, and will practice with data using statistical software.
Prerequisites: PSY 519 with a B- or higher.

PSY 551      RESEARCH WRITING I      Credits: 2

These seminars will prepare students for professional practice in community psychology settings and further graduate training through workshops (e.g., thesis preparation, constructing a curriculum vitae), guest speakers, and group support.

PSY 552      RESEARCH WRITING II      Credits: 2

These seminars will prepare students for professional practice in community psychology settings and further graduate training through workshops (e.g., thesis preparation, constructing a curriculum vitae), guest speakers, and group support.

PSY 553      RESEARCH WRITING III      Credit: 1

This course will be the third in a series of graduate seminars in research writing. The focus in this seminar will be assisting the preparation of student MA thesis manuscripts for defense and publication in academic journals.
Prerequisites: PSY 551 and PSY 552 with a B- or higher.

PSY 556      FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING      Credits: 2

This course investigates the concepts of grants, investigating grant opportunities, research for grant development, writing grants, receiving and managing grants. Emphasis is also given to skills required for direct solicitation fundraising programs, such as annual fund drives, special events, phone-a-thons, direct mail campaigns and planned giving activities. Students will learn to conduct donor/prospect research and make effective appeals to donors, develop fundraising plans and design positive promotional materials.

PSY 560      PROGRAM EVALUATION AND APPLIED QUALITATIVE METHODS      Credits: 3

This class provides an overview of the field of program evaluation, with an emphasis on providing students with essential knowledge for conducting effective program evaluations in organizations and related community settings. Students will acquire an understanding of the phases of program evaluation, particularly those relevant to conducting needs assessments of various populations.

PSY 561      CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND MEDIATION      Credits: 2

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of mediation and conflict resolution, with a focus on both the nature of conflict and our understanding of what resolution seeks to achieve. Through small groups, simulated conflict situations, and examples from various community settings, students will learn how to assess common causes of conflict, and its effect on individuals and communities. Students will also learn about different forms of dispute resolution, including recent research on forgiveness completed through the Stanford Forgiveness Project, and the primary models of mediation and the mediation process.

PSY 562      SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH      Credits: 2

This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary perspectives on the role of culture in understanding human behavior and psychiatric diagnoses. Students will become familiar with different perspectives on culture and mental health, with the goal of refining students’ cultural competence in research and professional practice with diverse individuals and groups.

PSY 563      HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 2

This class provides an overview of the field of health psychology, with an emphasis on how socio-cultural and economic factors influence health beliefs and health behaviors. Students will learn the history of health psychology, major theories in the field, and methods of applying health psychology knowledge to promoting health and preventing diseases.

PSY 564      SOCIAL POLICY AND ADVOCACY      Credits: 2

This course will examine the role of social policy and advocacy in community psychology and public health. Students will explore the roles communities and nonprofits play in influencing the public policy process. This course will analyze the range of advocacy strategies available to communities and individuals, and will provide students with an opportunity to plan, implement, and evaluate an advocacy campaign.

PSY 570      COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY      Credits: 3

This class provides an introduction to community psychology, with an emphasis on the ways in which communities, organizations, and broader social systems are strengthened to meet people’s needs. Students will apply psychological principles to social and organizational issues, and will learn how the field of community psychology plans and implements community changes, advances social justice, and uses research to inform and evaluate this work.

PSY 580      SOCIAL INEQUALITY      Credits: 3

This course will use the research and literature on human diversity and international psychology to deepen students multicultural, cross-cultural, and diversity awareness. An emphasis will be given to the ways in which dimensions of culture, ethnicity, lifestyle, religion, class, and economic status affect individuals and groups. Psychological perspectives and interventions will be studied from across many cultures.

PSY 581      COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION      Credits: 2

This course will introduce students to the primary theories and methods of community prevention and intervention. Students will examine core ecological constructs in community settings, and theories of psychological dysfunction and well-being, stress, and social support. Emphasis in the course will be given to preventing problem behaviors and promoting social change through self-help, empowerment, community-based mental health interventions, social policy and social justice.

PSY 590      INTERNSHIP I      Credits: 3

This is the first of two courses students complete at a local community site. Students will have the opportunity to complete internships at innovative and diverse social organizations in the Portland metropolitan area, including nonprofits, government agencies, healthcare settings, schools, religious communities, and other programs creatively working toward social justice. Students completing internships will acquire and refine skills and competencies essential to both employment and doctoral study.

PSY 591      INTERNSHIP II      Credits: 3

This is the second of two courses students complete to fulfill the community internship requirement. Students will have the opportunity to complete internships at innovative and diverse social organizations in the Portland metropolitan area, including nonprofits, government agencies, healthcare settings, schools, religious communities, and other programs creatively working toward social justice. Students completing the internship will acquire and refine skills and competencies essential to both employment and doctoral study.

PSY 593      THESIS I      Credits: 3

This course is the first of two dedicated to the Master’s Thesis research project. Students will complete a thorough literature review on a topic related to community psychology, including developing both the primary bibliography as well as the introductory sections for a thesis. In addition, a detailed description of the scope or experimental design of the thesis will be produced.

PSY 594      THESIS II      Credits: 3

This is the second and final course dedicated to the Master’s Thesis research project. Students in the course will complete the following: data collection and analysis, written composition of results, completion of the thesis, and a thesis defense.